Smallest Federated Wiki workshop with Ward Cunningham on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011 at PIE

About

Interested in working with Ward Cunningham on his new wiki project? You can on Thursday, October 13th, 2011 at the Portland Incubator Experiment.

Wiki-founder Ward Cunningham shared his idea of a Smallest Federated Wiki SFW during IndieWebCamp this June. In a few short weeks, he brought his idea to life and is inviting others to work with him on it. This is the second worksession for people interested in contributing to the project.

What is SFW?

The Smallest Federated Wiki project wants to be small in the “easy to learn powerful ideas” version of small. It wants to be a wiki so that strangers can meet and create works of value together. And it wants to be federated so that the burden of maintaining long-lasting content is shared among those who care.

As Ward says,

Our new wiki innovates three ways:

  • It shares through federation,
  • composes by refactoring and
  • wraps data with visualization.

Resources

If you’re not yet familiar with Ward’s new wiki, check out the following resources

When

Thursday, October 13, 2011 from 6–8:30pm

Where

PIE: Portland Incubator Experiment
1227 NW Davis Street
Portland, OR 97209

Calagator
Plancast

An Introduction to Ward Cunningham’s Smallest Federated Wiki

History

Wiki-founder Ward Cunningham shared his idea of a Smallest Federated Wiki SFW during IndieWebCamp this June. In a few short weeks, he brought his idea to life and is inviting others to work with him on it!

What is SFW?

The Smallest Federated Wiki project wants to be small in the “easy to learn powerful ideas” version of small. It wants to be a wiki so that strangers can meet and create works of value together. And it wants to be federated so that the burden of maintaining long-lasting content is shared among those who care.

Resources

Project Overview

Source Code

Roadmap

Instance – New Simplest Federated Wiki Install
Live data – Try dragging around the sections to re-order them!
Live data rendered from JSON in JavaScript

Smallest Federated Wiki Collaboration Session

Come to PIE for a short hack session on smallest federated wikis. Max Ogden will also be joining us from San Francisco!

When

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 from 6–8pm

Where

PIE: Portland Incubator Experiment
1227 NW Davis Street
Portland, OR 97209

Calagator
Plancast

Come to Portland Wiki Wednesdays!

Portland's Wiki Wednesdays!

What’s a Wiki Wednesday?

Wiki Wednesdays are events for people interested and excited about Wiki software and the communities that use it. People get together to chat, learn about wikis, find jobs, talk deals and generally cavort. Wiki Wednesdays in Portland, Oregon are generally held the first Wednesday of each month. Everyone, from the expert to the merely curious, are welcome.

Portland Wiki Wednesday

Portland Wiki Wednesday happen weekly at altering locations It is a nice time and space to hang out, network, wiki-ize, and enjoy the amazing people who tend to show up there. I highly encourage anyone interested in Wikis to stop by sometime to check it out!

The Wiki Experience

Wikis are different from other types of collaboration systems. Often, they get you thinking in better and more constructive ways than simply creating your own website or blog.

The first time I went to Wiki Wednesday, I got to meet Ward Cunningham, the inventor of the Wiki. You can read about that here. He told me a bit about how wikis work, the mindset behind them, and how he came up with the idea. My life, from that point on, changed significantly. I now use wikis for the majority of my research and web work because they allow for the curation and accumulation of knowledge more readily than blogs.

Sound Interesting?

Learn more about Wiki Wednesday at their official website.

Portland Wiki Wednesday Locations

  • Backspace, 115 NW 5th Ave. (1st, 3rd, 4th Wednesdays of each month, until further notice.)
  • Blitz Pearl, 110 NW 10th Ave. (2nd Wednesday of each month, until further notice.)

Dorkbot PDX | Amazing People Doing Strange Things with Electricity

Dorkbot PDX Logo

Dorkbot PDX is a Portland group that brings together an eclectic group of geniuses with a love of hacking technology. It is probably my favorite group here because of the energy and excitement that everyone has. Every time I go I gain a new respect and excitement for all things electronic. Everyone is brilliant, welcoming and always has something to say or work on.

Dorkbot meets twice a month at Lucky Lab NW (1945 NW Quimby). This week, about thirty people showed up to exchange ideas, inventions, and electrionic hacks. Here, my friend Mario Landau-Holdsworth is testing out a makeshift synthesizer using a Benito [designed and built by Don from dorkbot]. Alex Norman tells me that, “the Benito uses some i2c io expanders to scan the buttons and talks to the computer via midi over USB. It is controlling a step sequencer that I wrote using Pure Data and pdlua. It is triggering one shot samples.. I’m currently using drum samples”.

Ward Cunningham’s Dial-a-Door

“AboutUs CTO Ward Cunningham and his college roommate Rick Wartzok, had better than average audio/visual and beverage capability in their dorm room, at least for 1968. While happy to share with fellow residents, they then faced a dilemma. What about keys? They wanted some kind of combination lock that had a shared code that could be selectively enabled, and a longer, master code for private use. The solution was Dial-a-Door. Now its 2008, forty years later, Ward has located the mechanical technology that decoded the combination, restored it to working order, and prepared a display which he will present at the bi-weekly DorkbotPDX at the Lucky Lab in Northwest Portland,” says Mark Dilley on the AboutUs.org Blog.

More about Dial-a-Door

“I’ve written a web page describing my original application, Dial-a-Door”, says Ward Cunningham on the Dorkbot PDX blog. I found the SECODER that I spoke about last meeting. It was in the bottom of the wrong junk box with old antenna equipment, not old telephone equipment. My mechanically inclined friends helped me get it working again”.  More information is available on Ward Cunningham’s website: http://c2.com/~ward/Dial-a-Door.

BittyBot

Along the way, I had the honor of meeting Monty Goodson of BittyBot. The name explains what he does — which is basically the manufacture of really tiny circuitboards that can be used to make really small robots. They were very, very small. The one pictured is actually larger than some of the others ones that he had with him.

If you like technology, I urge you to come out to Dorkbot and mingle with everyone. It’s a very low-key, wonderful environment where you can let your imagination and expertise run wild. And if you’re not familiar with what Dorkbot does, you might want to look into using the open source Arduino development and prototyping platform. There is an article on Arduino chips from Instructables here.

Dorkbot Resources

Thanks to Tempus Dictum and PNCA, Dorkbot has put together a series of workshops around the dorkbotpdx arduino kits (http://www.dorkbotpdx.org/wiki/dorkboard) called the “Arduino Cult Induction”.(http://www.dorkbotpdx.org/workshop/arduino/cult_induction_rev4).

We will have these workshops on the last Sunday of every month, probably alternating between the Cult Induction, a focused workshop and an Open Lab. The workshops cost ~$25 which includes the hardware being built. The open labs are free.

Schedule

30 NOV 2008 — Sound/Midi Workshop (~$25)

28 DEC 2008 — Open Lab (free)

———-

For more events, check out the AboutUs Portland Tech Events Page. You can also follow me on Twitter, or connect with other members of the Portland Tech Community on the AboutUs.org Portland Tech Twitter Page. You might also want to attend CyborgCamp, which will be happening on December 6th, 2008 at CubeSpace.

———

Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist from Portland, Oregon. She likes attending events and studying the Portland Tech scene.

Time and Space Compression through Ubiquity

Every click is a time-value liability. Every tab is a waste of time and space. The key is to reduce the amount of clicks needed.

Mozilla Labs | Ubiquity

Mozilla’s Ubiquity is concerned with reducing the time and space it takes to transfer user relevant information.

Do I trust that Mozilla will reduce the time-value liability incurred by the many modern managers of heavy data flows? Maybe.

The project is headed by Aza Raszin, Head of User Experience at Mozilla Labs and founder of founder of Humanized, Inc., and  Songza. As an interface showcase, including habituatable pie menus instead of linear menus; few icons; a high density of content and a correspondingly low amount of interaction[1]; undo instead of warnings[2]; and transparent messages [3] designed not to break the user’s train of thought. In the week after launch, Songza was used to play over 1 million songs.

Raskin is also the creator of Algorithm Ink, a port of the Context Free Art to Javascript. It has had artwork created by such computer luminaries as Ward Cunningham. Yesterday Vihn showed me Algorithm Ink at Aboutus.org (where Ward Cunningham currently works). It was very curious and elegant.