Two Talks at Qcon San Francisco: Virtual Reality and Calm Technology!

qcon-san-francisco-virtual-reality-amber-caseI’m excited to give the Keynote speech at QCon San Francisco (2016 Conference: Nov 7-9 Workshops: Nov 10-11) this coming week! I’ll be speaking on Monday, November 7th at 9am. This will be both and old and new talk.

What’s new? I’ll be extending an early talk I did on the history of wearable computing by adding an entirely new section on Virtual Reality! I’ve been holed up in Portland’s N Portland VR Lab taking video of all of everything VR, from rumblepacks and in-room sensors to games that shrink and grow depending on how much space you have for them!

Keynote: The History and Future of Wearable Computing and Virtual Experience

Location: Grand Ballroom ABC
Day of week: Monday, Nov 7, 2016.
Duration: 9:00am – 10:10am

Summary

Miniature electronics and and global supply chains have us on the cusp of a new era of human experience. Early forms of wearable computing focused on augmenting the human ability to compute freely. As pioneer Steve Mann and calm technology pioneer Mark Weiser wanted, “to free the human to not act as a machine”. What does this mean for us as designers and developers, and how can we build interfaces for the next generation of devices?

Who was here before us, and how can we best learn from them? These are the machines that will be a part of our lives in only a few years from now, and the best way to learn about the future is to dig into the past. This talk will focus on trends in wearable computing and VR as it developed from the 1960s to now, and then into the future. This talk will cover various topics on the history and future of wearables. We’ll learn about Ivan Sutherland, human augmentation, infrastructure, machine vision, processing, distributed computing and wireless data transfer, a church dedicated to VR, computer backpacks, heads up displays, reality editing, job simulators and unexplored realms of experience that haven’t yet come to life. We’ll also learn about the road from virtual reality to augmented reality and what we need to build to get there. This talk is for anyone interested in how we can add a new layer of interactivity to our world and how we can take the next steps to get there.

I’ll be giving an additional talk in addition to my keynote! Details below:

Second Talk: Designing Calm Technology

Track: UX Reimagined
Location: Seacliff ABC
Day of week: Wednesday, November 9th, 2016.
Duration: 1:40pm – 2:30pm

Summary

Our world is made of information that competes for our attention. What is needed? What is not? We cannot interact with our everyday life in the same way we interact with a desktop computer. The terms calm computing and calm technology were coined in 1995 by PARC Researchers Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown in reaction to the increasing complexities that information technologies were creating. Calm technology describes a state of technological maturity where a user’s primary task is not computing, but being human. The idea behind Calm Technology is to have smarter people, not things. Technology shouldn’t require all of our attention, just some of it, and only when necessary.

How can our devices take advantage of location, proximity and haptics to help improve our lives instead of get in the way? How can designers can make apps “ambient” while respecting privacy and security? This talk will cover how to use principles of Calm Technology to design the next generation of connected devices. We’ll look at notification styles, compressing information into other senses, and designing for the least amount of cognitive overhead.

Calm Technology Keynote at UX Week 2016, August 9-12 in San Francisco, CA

ph-san_francisco

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be keynoting UX Week 2016, one of the premiere UX Conferences in the United States! Now in its 14th year, UX Week brings together design professionals from all over the world.

uxweek-san-francisco-2016-amber-case

 

Location

The conference will take place at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco: 5 Embarcadero Center, San Francisco, CA 94111.

Want to Attend?

You can learn more about the conference and see the full lineup of speakers here!

November Project SF!

Blade Runner Blues by Saul Espinosa

I woke up at 5:30am in San Francisco this morning. It was dark and extremely rainy, and my flight back to Portland, Oregon was due to depart SFO Airport at 9:10am. But I wasn’t going to the airport. I was going running. Really going running. And as I put on my running shoes and a thin sweatshirt, I pushed all thoughts of the insanity of what I was doing out of my mind. This morning I would run with Tantek Çelik (the person who encouraged me to join him on this early morning adventure).

Sound intense? It is, but it’s also not. Why? Because the workout series is part of a movement called The November Project, and it’s a social way to ensure you do crazy things like this. It’s fun because you run with a lot of people (like 50-60 people!). It’s okay to be the last one to finish. It’s okay to fail, to push yourself and to be yourself.

Our first run started at Haight street and ended at Alamo Square park. It was so dark that Tantek wore a headlamp to guide us through the darkened, empty streets. Few cars passed us, allowing us to run across intersections with ease. As we went up and down each hill I began to feel like we were floating through the city on tall waves. Aiming to conserve my energy, I tried to jog as lightly as possible. This heightened the feeling of floating.

As we ran through the warn rain, I could make out people every once in a while at street corners, jogging in place to keep warm as they waited for us to join them. “We’re picking up people Katamari style!” said Tantek. And we did. As we picked up each group member from house to house, intersection to intersection, we commented and laughed about how crazy a morning it was to be running in this kind of weather.

This is what we looked like. From left to right: Me and November Project SF members Tantek, Lillian and Andrew.

Alt text

But this wasn’t the workout. Running from Haight Street to Alamo Square Park was not our goal. This run was the ‘ride’ to the workout. You see, these these particular members of the SF November Project group formerly ran seperately to their workout site. Once they figured out how close they lived to each other, a common path emerged that they started doing every week out of habit. Now every Wednesday morning they have a Katamari-like experience of gathering an ever-growing group on the run over to Alamo square.

After about twenty minutes we made it to Alamo Square Park. Look familiar? It’s known for Full House and the Pianted Ladies, pictured below:

Alamo Square Park Painted Ladies by Flickr:iamagenious

There were about 40-50 people at the top of the park in various rain gear and running shoes. I was already warmed up from the run there, so I ditched my hoodie under a tree. Everyone was already soaked to the bone, so we began the run quickly, but not before a lot of excitement and jumping. The workout was intense, but relatively straightforward:

  • Start in the middle of Alamo Square
  • Run out to Hayes Street, turn left and do a lap around the park, and run back to the middle
  • Run to the SW corner and back
  • 50 pushups
  • Run to the NW corner and back
  • 50 sit-ups
  • Run to the NE corner and back
  • 50 sergeant lunges (25 each side)
  • Run to the SE corner and back
  • 25 burpees
  • Run out to Hayes, turn right and do a lap around the park, and run back to the middle.
  • Group Photo

When you’re a kid, you’re allowed and expected to be an amateur. You’re encouraged to try new things. Failing is part of the experience. You might get the lucky support of parents, teachers or other loved ones. You have time to experiment and to slowly build skills.

As adults, we are expected to do things well or not do them at all. In a society where so much of what we consume is ‘professionally done’ or at least ‘complete’ it becomes difficult to start from the bottom. We feel awkward and self conscious. Part of this problem is what November Project aims to solve. If you have a bunch of people with you doing the same difficult thing you are doing, you will be more likely to do that thing. With enough people you’ll always have someone who is just ahead of you, and someone you finally surpass from the last time.

With so many people running alongside you you’re less likely to feel like you’re the last one to finish, especially if they all wait for you at the end and line up high fives, or run with you because you’ve lagged behind and they’ve already finished. When you want to do anything, you have to start somewhere. You have to be an amateur. The November Project is an excellent social structure for getting people to do difficult things.

I was the last one to finish. I ran the slowest, walked a little bit, and couldn’t do all of the exercises to completion. But you know what? Someone always finishes last. The group understands and expects this. They all started there and worked their way to the front. To help, the best runners ran an extra lap with me around the park, telling me to keep going and run with them. So I did. When it was over we all got into a big group photo full of endorphins and rain and sweat and glee.

November Project at Alamo Square Park

When it was over we ran all the way back to Haight street in our little pod of people and it was easy. And I showered and caught my flight back home and went straight to work that day with a renewed zest for life.

You can read more about November Project SF and this week’s workout here: Rain Halts Traffic, Not Workout in San Francisco

Alamo Square Park photo credit: Flickr: iamagenious. Image credit: Blade Runner Blues by Saul Espinosa

Thanks to Tantek for bringing me along! Read Tantek’s post on The November Project.

Get Excited and Make Things with Science at Science Hack Day San Francisco!

We’re very excited to kick-off the announcement of Science Hack Day SF!

A Hack Day is an event that brings together various types of geeks in the same physical space for a brief but intense period of collaboration, hacking, and creating awesome things. A hack is a quick solution to a problem – maybe not the most elegant solution, but often the cleverest (e.g. mashing up APIs, datasets and web interfaces from different sources in new and interesting ways).

A Hack Day is usually 48 hours long and involves a sleepover …although not much sleeping happens when everyone is either hacking or playing Werewolf. Some Hack Days have a specific focus. There have already been very successful Music Hack Days and Government Hack Days. It’s time for a Hack Day focused on Science! The mission of Science Hack Day is to get excited and make things with science!

Who is Science Hack Day for?

Imagine a Venn diagram showing the intersection of web geeks and science geeks …that’s a pretty big intersection. Science Hack Day is for anyone with an interest in bringing science and technology together (from dabbling with APIs/datasets/interface design to biotech experiments and prototyping near-space payloads). If you’re a coder, designer, scientist, citizen scientist, hacker or just an enthusiastic person with good ideas, Science Hack Day is for you.

When, Where, Who, What, How?

• When: November 13-14, 2010
• Where: Institute For The Future (124 University Ave, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 – 2 min. walk from Caltrain)
• Schedule
• Hack Ideas, APIs + Datasets (feel free to start adding to these pages whether or not you can attend!)
• Updates: follow @sciencehackday and/or subscribe to the wiki
• URLs: http://sf.sciencehackday.com and http://sciencehackday.pbworks.com/SF

How do I register to attend?

You can sign up for Science Hack Day here!

There are of course a lot more details to be announced (sponsors, competition categories and prizes for best hacks, etc.), so stay tuned! Any questions, interested in sponsoring or want to get in touch with us about Science Hack Day? Send emails to ariel@arielwaldman.com.

Hack on Geoloqi at SF Hack Day!

We’re very excited announce that we’ll be bringing Geoloqi to San Francisco for a Science Education + Geoloqi mashup.
We’re going to work on Geonotes based around science education. We’ll be creating Geonotes around town for kids to pick up and learn about science in the process. We can even make a game of it if there’s time. It all depends on who helps out, and what ideas get tossed around! We’re all very excited to see what happens! and we’ve got some great hackers signed up to help out!

Hackers:

* Kishore Hari, Bay Area Science, @sciencequiche
* Amber Case, Geoloqi, @caseorganic, @caseorganic
* Aaron Parecki, Geoloqi, @aaronpk, @aaronpk
* Jun Yin, Chemical and Evolutionary Biologist, @junnibug @junnibug
* Kevin Rohling, Developer, @sundriedcoder @sundriedcoder
* Jade Wang, Scientist, @qiqing @qiqing
* You?

About Geoloqi

Geoloqi is a secure, open source platform for location sharing. You can learn more about what you can do with Geoloqi here, and if you’re a developer, have a look at the Geoloqi API. ReadWriteWeb also did a pretty excellent write-up about Geoloqi.

Who is organizing this?

First and foremost, Science Enthusiast Ariel Waldman is leading the Hack Day charge. As founder and veteran of Cupcake Camp, she has a lot of expeience. Helping her out is an amazing team of science enthusiasts and hackers, including:

Arfon Smith (Galaxy Zoo), Ariel Waldman (Spacehack.org), myself – Amber Case (CyborgCamp + Geoloqi), Ben Ward (Twitter), David Harris (Symmetry Magazine), Ed Gutman (Twitter), Eri Gentry (BioCurious), Ian Fung (UserVoice), Jeremy Keith (Clearleft), Jessy Cowan-Sharp (UMD), Kirsten “Dr. Kiki” Sanford (This Week In Science), Kishore Hari (UCSF), Mathias Crawford (Institute For The Future), Matt Hancher (Google), Matt Wood (Amazon Web Services), Tantek Çelik (Microformats.org + Mozilla). You can follow all of us on Twitter here!

So what are you waiting for? Book your travel and show up at Science Hack Day this November. It’s on a weekend – you can pop down to SF and back to Portland in a jiffy. And if you’re a developer, designer or science educator, we’d love you on our team!

Get brainstorming!

Remember, you don’t need to have experience with hacking on science-related things to attend – just an excitement for experimenting with it! And if you can’t make it, it doesn’t mean you can’t contribute some ideas. We’d love to hear them!

Visualizing eComm and the Augmented Reality Conference 2010 with Stacked Graphs

Note: This is a content preview of a full resolution PDF report that will be made available on the site next week.

A stacked graph method is one way of displaying buzz around speakers and topics at conferences. I’ve been tracking conferences with stream/stacked graphs for the last two years.

In a way, the stacked graph is a more organic version of a bar graph, because it can be used to show an increase and decrease in volumes of conversation around a subject.

eComm Emerging Communications Conference - Augmented Reality Conference

What is This?

This is a stacked graph displaying Tweets associated with the #eComm and #arconf hashtags during the three days of San Francisco’s Emerging Communications Conference and the Augmented Reality Conference from 4/19/10-4/21/10.

The interesting part about visualizing data in this way is that it shows that there is an inherent difference between what a speaker says and what an audience “hears”. Hearing, in this case, is defined by how a speaker’s name, company, and words are picked up by microbloggers and re-tweeted online.

After looking at the full graph of the conference over three days, @anthropunk commented that while the streamgraph for #arconf was significantly larger than those for the other days, it did not necessarily mean that the first two days of the conference were not interesting, but that there were simply more people tweeting during the last day of the conference.

History

Until recently, I used a Java applet that only queried the last 1000 tweets associated with a word. A month ago, stacked graph creator Lee Byron, released his source code, allowing Nathan Bergey to build an open source version of the Neoformix Twitter Stream Graph. Aaron Parecki was whitelisted on the Twitter API, and their combined capabilities allowed for a greater level of data visualization to occur.

Now we all have an excellent way to visualize Tweets associated with conference hashtags. This method of data visualization is an improvement on a the process I used to visualize the Internet Strategy Forum Summit 2009 and the Internet Strategy Forum 2008.

This project was originally inspired by the Neoformix Twitter Stream graph. It was a clunky, limited machine programmed in Java. After several requests for the source code, we were forced to make our own. The result is a much better, lighter, and faster loading system that has a linear time scale. Nathan Bergey was the force behind this. He created a Python Stream Graph Library that Aaron Parecki was able to use to make the graphs.

Stream Graphs and Wordle Clouds

A stacked graph shows the same data as a Wordle graph, but adds an axis of time.

The conference visualization is split up into sections according to time. Each day and time period has two graphs associated with it. One is the stacked graph, and the other is a Wordle graph. The stacked graph shows time and volume, while the Worlde simply shows volume.

Monday, April 19th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/2010

Morning

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Morning 4/19/10

8:45:00 AM

Introduction

Hello and Welcome (Replacement)

Doc Searls, Harvard University/UC Santa Barbara

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM
Keynote
The Future of P2P
Eric Klinker, Bit Torrent

9:00:00 – 9:22:30 AM, Salon E

9:22:30 AM
Keynote
Communications Heading Into The Cloud
Craig Walker, Google

9:22:30 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Keynote

The National Broadband Plan and the Future of the Internet

Carlos Kirjner, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

9:45:00 – 10:07:30 AM, Salon E

10:07:30 AM

Keynote

The Rise of the Open Network: Or How I was David Isenberged into Submission

JP Rangaswami, British Telecom/Ribbit

10:07:30 – 10:30:00 AM, Salon E

10:30:00 AM

Break

Morning Break

11:15:00 AM

Keynote

Social Sharing 2.0: The Rise of Real-Time

Jonathan Rosenberg, Skype

11:15:00 – 11:35:00 AM, Salon E

11:35:00 AM

Keynote

Identity for Global Communication

Cullen Jennings, Cisco

11:35:00 – 11:55:00 AM, Salon E

11:55:00 AM

An Anthropologist’s Eye for the Tech Guy: Emerging Market Opportunities in a Post-BRIC World

Dawn Nafus, Intel

11:55:00 – 12:10:00 PM, Salon E

12:10:00 PM

Launch

Ringio Launch

Michael Zirngibl, Ringio

12:10:00 – 12:17:30 PM, Salon E

12:17:30 PM

Launch

CounterPath Launch

Donovan Jones, CounterPath

12:17:30 – 12:25:00 PM, Salon E

12:25:00 PM

Launch

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Telio Launch

Alan Duric, Telio

12:25:00 – 12:32:30 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/19/2010

2:00:00 PM


The Future of Mobile Networks: Offloading Congested Mobile Networks with a Software-Only Approach

Elad Barkan, Bzeek

2:00:00 – 2:10:00 PM, Salon E

2:10:00 PM

How Open Data and the Gov 2.0 Movement are Changing Communications With Government

Mark Headd, Tele-Works, Inc.

2:10:00 – 2:20:00 PM, Salon E

2:20:00 PM

Keynote

What Can Cities be Like When Everything Talks

Assaf Biderman, MIT

2:20:00 – 2:40:00 PM, Salon E

2:40:00 PM

Lightning Talk

With 500 Ways to Communicate, Why Should a Customer Choose Your New Offering?

Jared Goralnick, AwayFind

2:40:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

Orbiting Data Centers for Global Connectivity

Keith Lofstrom, Server Sky

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

Your Reality is Augmented

Benjamin Joffe, +8*

3:00:00 – 3:15:00 PM, Salon E

3:15:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Evening

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/19/2010

4:00:00 PM

Keynote

Making Music with the World on the iPad and iPhone

Ge Wang, Smule/Stanford

4:00:00 – 4:30:00 PM, Salon E

4:30:00 PM

Mobile Video Communication – iPhone & Android Lead the Way

Jan Linden, Global IP Solutions

4:30:00 – 4:45:00 PM, Salon E

4:45:00 PM

Recombinant Communications Manifesto: Piecing Together the Disaggregated Infrastructure

Dan Miller, Opus Research

4:45:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

Disruption and Death: Telephony, Open Platform and Network APIs

Oren Michels, Mashery

5:00:00 – 5:15:00 PM, Salon E

5:15:00 PM

Evolution of Mobile Applications: Role of WebKit and High-End Browsers

Benoit Schillings, Myriad Group AG

5:15:00 – 5:30:00 PM, Salon E

5:30:00 PM

Designing For The Future

Julia Tsao, yU+co/Fair Enough
5:30:00 – 5:40:00 PM, Salon E
5:40:00 PM

STATUS: Bringing User Presence To The Voice World

Zhao Lu, Orange Labs

5:40:00 – 5:50:00 PM, Salon E

5:50:00 PM

Keynote

(Moved to Tuesday 10:00-10:15, Due To Volcanic Ash) Cloud Communications and How to Destroy a $700bn Industry for Fun and Profit

Martin Geddes, Independent

5:50:00 – 6:05:00 PM, Salon E

5:50:00 PM

Beyond Voice – Designing an Open Communications Platform (Moved Into Slot, Due To Volcanic Ash)

Jose de Castro, Voxeo

5:50:00 – 6:05:00 PM, Salon E

6:05:00 PM

Keynote

Macro Trends and Predictions in Mobile Broadband (Calling In Due To Volcanic Ash)

Moray Rumney, Agilent

6:05:00 – 6:25:00 PM, Salon E

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/20/2010

eComm Wordle Graph Entire Day 4/20/2010

Morning

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/20/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/20/2010

8:45:00 AM

Introduction

Introductions (Replacement)

Benoit Schillings, Myriad Group AG

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM

Keynote

Infrastructure Shift: The Long-Term Challenge of Change

John Hagel, LLP Center for the Edge

9:00:00 – 9:30:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Beyond Squeezing Lemons: The Future of Collaborative Business Models

Anders Sundelin, CIP

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

Managing Growth and Profits in the Yottabyte Era (Replacement)

Chetan Sharma, Chetan Sharma Consulting

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Customer Experience in the Call Center: Can the Leaks in the Pipeline be Fixed?

Shai Berger, F?nolo

9:45:00 – 10:00:00 AM, Salon E

10:00:00 AM

(Moved to Monday 17:50-18:05, Due To Volcanic Ash) Beyond Voice – Designing an Open Communications Platform

Jose de Castro, Voxeo

10:00:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:00:00 AM

Cloud Communications and How to Destroy a $700bn Industry for Fun and Profit (Moved Into Slot, Due To Volcanic Ash)

Martin Geddes, Independent

10:00:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:15:00 AM

Break

Morning Break

11:00:00 AM

Yesterday’s Wire for Tomorrow’s Apps?

Brian Harris, New Mexico Attorney General

11:00:00 – 11:15:00 AM, Salon E

11:15:00 AM

Internet Gone Mobile

Richard Bennett, ITIF

11:15:00 – 11:30:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Ubiquitous Collaboration: The Next Wave of Productivity?

Joe Burton, Cisco

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

Teleku :: Cloud Communications (Replacement)

Chris Matthieu, GetVocal

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

Keynote

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Our National Broadband Plan: The End of the Beginning?

Richard Whitt, Google

11:45:00 – 12:05:00 PM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

Yeah I’m Stuck Too (Replacement)

Patrick Murphy, VoiceSage

11:45:00 – 12:00:00 PM, Salon E

12:00:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Moderator Introduction

Brough Turner, Ashtonbrooke

12:00:00 – 12:07:00 PM, Salon E

12:07:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Paul Brigner Introduction

Paul Brigner, Verizon

12:07:00 – 12:09:00 PM, Salon E

12:09:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Susan Estrada Introduction

Susan Estrada, FirstMile.US

12:09:00 – 12:11:00 PM, Salon E

12:11:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Tracy Rosenberg Introduction

Tracy Rosenberg, Media Alliance

12:11:00 – 12:13:00 PM, Salon E

12:13:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Richard Bennett Introduction

Richard Bennett, ITIF

12:13:00 – 12:15:00 PM, Salon E

12:15:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan

Brough Turner, Ashtonbrooke

12:15:00 – 12:35:00 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/20/2010

eComm Wordle Graph Afternoon 4/20/2010

2:00:00 PM

Panel

Walk-On Panel

You!

2:00:00 – 2:30:00 PM, Salon E

2:30:00 PM

Participatory Sensing

Deborah Estrin, UCLA Computer Science Department

2:30:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

Mapping Mobile Social Networks with NodeXL: Finding Key Users, Groups, and Locations

Marc A Smith, ConnectedAction

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

The 6th Sense Accelerator: When Mobile Meets Intuition

Barak Hachamov, My6sense

3:00:00 – 3:15:00 PM, Salon E

3:15:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Evening

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/20/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/20/2010

4:00:00 PM

Bring Your Own Wireless: How Smart Mobile Phones are Revolutionizing Wireline Customers

Piers Finlayson, Metaswitch

4:00:00 – 4:15:00 PM, Salon E

4:15:00 PM

Everything You Think You Know About High Performance Military Communications is Wrong

Tom Katis, RebelVox

4:15:00 – 4:30:00 PM, Salon E

4:30:00 PM

Keynote

Smart People, Dumb Objects, Networked Environments

Usman Haque, Pachube/Connected Environments

4:30:00 – 4:50:00 PM, Salon E

4:50:00 PM

From Distraction to Real Life, Humanizing our Mobile Future

Kristian Simsarian, IDEO

4:50:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

A Glimpse Into the Future if XMPP and Wave are Successful

Jason Kolb, Cisco

5:00:00 – 5:15:00 PM, Salon E

5:15:00 PM

A Telephone System for the Next Three Billion

David A. Burgess, Kestrel Signal Processing

5:15:00 – 5:30:00 PM, Salon E

5:30:00 PM

Demo

Towards Painless, Free, Open Phone Data

Troy Davis, Cloudvox

5:30:00 – 5:40:00 PM, Salon E

5:40:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Introduction

Mike Rowehl, Mobile Monday Silicon Valley

5:40:00 – 5:42:00 PM, Salon E

5:42:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – CrowdScanner

Adrian Avendano, Meetforeal & CrowdScanner

5:42:00 – 5:45:00 PM, Salon E

5:45:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Aloqa

Sanjeev Agrawal, Aloqa

5:45:00 – 5:48:00 PM, Salon E

5:48:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – My6sense

Barak Hachamov, My6sense

5:48:00 – 5:51:00 PM, Salon E

5:51:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Waze

Di-Ann Eisnor, Waze

5:51:00 – 5:54:00 PM, Salon E

5:54:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Trippo VoiceMagix

Kimmo Sainio, Cellictica

5:54:00 – 5:57:00 PM, Salon E

5:57:00 PM

The Information in Everything: The Augmented Future of Communications

Adam Broitman, Circ.us

5:57:00 – 6:12:00 PM, Salon E

6:12:00 PM

Lightning Talk

Walk and Talk: Augmenting Conversation

Phil Wolff, Reef9 Media

6:12:00 – 6:17:00 PM, Salon E

6:20:00 PM

Event

Free Drinks Social Networking


Wednesday, April 21th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Entire Day 4/19/10

Morning

eComm Stream Graph Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Morning 4/19/10

8:30:00 AM

Introduction

Introductions (Replacement)

Christine Perey, Perey Research & Consulting

8:30:00 – 8:45:00 AM, Salon E

8:45:00 AM

Sci-Fi to Sci-Fact: How Computer Vision Will Change AR and the World

Ben Newhouse, Yelp

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM

Keynote

Searches Originating Inside and Outside of your Head

Hartmut Neven, Google

9:00:00 – 9:30:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

Generating Revenues with Mobile AR: The Ecosystem, Business Models and Metrics

Christine Perey, Perey Research & Consulting

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Keynote

Bridging the Gap Between Desktop and Mobile Augmented Reality

Blake Callens, Zugara

9:45:00 – 10:05:00 AM, Salon E

10:05:00 AM

What’s Wrong With ‘Reality’?

Usman Haque, Pachube/Connected Environments

10:05:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:15:00 AM

Break

Morning Break


Late Morning

eComm Wordle Graph Late Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Late Morning 4/19/10

11:00:00 AM

A View to a Future; Beyond the Hype of Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

Dana Farbo, Acrossair

11:00:00 – 11:15:00 AM, Salon E

11:15:00 AM

User Experience: A Possible Roadblock to AR Adoption

Tony Fernandes, The UE Group

11:15:00 – 11:30:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

Context Is King: AR, Salience, and the Constant Next Scenario

Clark Dodsworth, Osage Associates Consulting

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

The Wizard is Us: Symbiogenesis by Networking Part 1

Arturo Sinclair, Digital Worlds Institute

11:45:00 – 11:52:50 AM, Salon E

11:52:50 AM

The Wizard is Us: Symbiogenesis by Networking Part 2

Anton Yudin, Digital Worlds Institute

11:52:50 – 12:00:00 PM, Salon E

12:00:00 PM

Applying WWW Best Practices to AR

Erik Bovee, Mobilizy

12:00:00 – 12:15:00 PM, Salon E

12:15:00 PM

Where AR We Heading?

Steven Feiner, Columbia University

12:15:00 – 12:30:00 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stream Graph Afternoon 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Afternoon 4/19/10

2:00:00 PM

Advancing the Business of AR, A Practical, Commercial Solution

Pamela Kerwin, GeoVector

2:00:00 – 2:15:00 PM, Salon E

2:15:00 PM

Who Will Own Our Augmented Reality?

Anselm Hook, Meedan

2:15:00 – 2:25:00 PM, Salon E

2:25:00 PM

Mobile Augmented Reality: The World Is Your Playground

Brian Selzer, Ogmento

2:25:00 – 2:35:00 PM, Salon E

2:35:00 PM

Spatial Computing: Designing an Interface for our Bodies

Albert Hwang, phedhex.com

2:35:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

AR Today and Tomorrow

Bruno Uzzan, Total Immersion

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

Advancing AR – Beyond Labels

Ivan Franco, YDreams

3:00:00 – 3:10:00 PM, Salon E

3:10:00 PM

Junaio and the Unifeye SDK Mobile Development Platform

Peter Meier, metaio GmbH

3:10:00 – 3:25:00 PM, Salon E

3:25:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Early Evening

eComm Wordle Graph Early Evening 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Early Evening 4/19/10

4:00:00 PM

Keynote

Future Vision: Decade of Ubiquity (Augmented Reality 2010-2020)

Robert Rice, Neogence Enterprises

4:00:00 – 4:20:00 PM, Salon E

4:20:00 PM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Visual Recognition, the Future of Mobile AR browsers

David Marimon, Telefonica R&D

4:20:00 – 4:35:00 PM, Salon E

4:20:00 PM

Augmented Reality & The Venture Capital Community

David Blumberg, Blumberg Capital

4:20:00 – 4:35:00 PM, Salon E

4:35:00 PM

Seeing the Future of AR Through Digital Eyewear

Yohan Baillot, (Independent)

4:35:00 – 4:45:00 PM, Salon E

4:45:00 PM

Eyeborg – Terminator Lives

Rob Spence, Eyeborg Project

4:45:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

Keynote

Strange Days. How the Computing Experience is Turning Inside Out

Mark Rolston, frog design

5:00:00 – 5:20:00 PM, Salon E

5:20:00 PM

Break

Late Afternoon Break


Late Evening

eComm Stream Graph Evening 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Evening 4/19/10

5:45:00 PM

Story as Software

John du Pre Gauntt, Media Dojo

5:45:00 – 6:00:00 PM, Salon E

6:00:00 PM

Solid to Liquid to Air: Cyborg Anthropology and the Future of the Interface

Amber Case, CyborgCamp

6:00:00 – 6:15:00 PM, Salon E

6:15:00 PM

Navigation Rising! A Deep Look at Live Mapping and Augmented Reality in the Car

Di-Ann Eisnor, Waze

6:15:00 – 6:30:00 PM, Salon E

6:30:00 PM

Building Business Models Around Augmented Reality

Matthew Szymczyk, Zugara

6:30:00 – 6:45:00 PM, Salon E

6:45:00 PM

Building Mobile Augmented Reality Applications with 3DAR

Mark Anderson, Bordertown Labs

6:45:00 – 7:00:00 PM, Salon E

7:00:00 PM

AR and the Mass-Market Business Opportunity

Matt Miesnieks, Layar

7:00:00 – 7:10:00 PM, Salon E

7:10:00 PM

Liberating AR from Basemaps, Markers and Overlays

Eric Kabisch, University of California, Department of Informatics

7:10:00 – 7:22:30 PM, Salon E

7:22:30 PM

Vision Based Mobile AR – A New User Interface For Mobile Applications?

Michael Gervautz, Qualcomm

7:22:30 – 7:35:00 PM, Salon E

7:35:00 PM

The Future of Augmented Reality

Steve Hoffman, ThinkHuge

7:35:00 – 7:50:00 PM, Salon E

7:50:00 PM

Event

Free Drinks Social Networking


Conclusions

Credits:

This image was created by Nathan Bergey (@natronics) and Aaron Parecki (@aaronpk). Aaron took data from the Twitter API and passed it through Nathan’s Python Twitter stacked graph library. This image excludes the actual “#ecomm” and &quote;#arconf” terms leaving more room for the other terms to show through.

About

Stacked Graph History
Here’s a link to Lee Byron’s original Stacked Graph paper, “Stacked Graphs – Geometry & Aesthetics” www.leebyron.com/else/streamgraph/

“streamgraph_generator” can be checked out from github.

You can make these as well by downloading @natronic’s Python Stream Graph Library on GitHub.

Get the StreamGraph Python Code on Github

—–

About

Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist living and working in Portland, Oregon. You can follow her on Twitter at @caseorganic.