Privacy in the Time of Facebook – Interviews on CBC Radio and the Takeaway

Last week, I was contacted by two radio stations for interviews on Facebook and privacy. I’ve been studying Facebook heavily since it launched in February 2004. As a digital anthropologist, Facebook’s success and information architecture have been an intense obsession of mine.

In December 2009, I went to the Banff Centre in Canada to spend a month doing independent research. As I narrowed my focus of study, I found myself looking more closely at Facebook. Facebook has a sort of technosocial gravity not prevalent in other social applications. It is the Amazon.com of friendship, where micronarratives and recommendation systems allow one to read the lives of others as one might read a newspaper article or book.

Part of Facebook’s pull has to do with the instantaneity of  broadcasts and subsequent immediate feedback. Social rewards and often faster and more widespread in the digital world than in real life. Also, the rewards have a quantitative and lasting value. If you share something intimate, you can get multiple comments and multiple likes. You get immediate feedback. It feels good. And the more you reveal about yourself, the more you often get back. Eventually, you can feel a sense of community where you might otherwise feel you don’t. If you think about it, it’s like a cross between playing a videogame and being your own micro celebrity.

. They show up faster. There is more of an adrenaline rush. Every social interaction and success becomes quantifiable. One can get mega points (when their content goes viral) or micro points for micro updates. Analog interaction is less quantifiable and not as far reaching. THis is the same reason why one is addicted to Farmville-like games.

Why are we so okay with sharing everything?

Privacy. Do people really want it?

-Celebrity

-Analog Sharing

One to one, or one to group.

Celebrity is one to many.

-Digital Sharing

One to many. Similar to celebrity. Owning the means of producing

systemic value.


The idea of using Brightkite to end a picture of a kid — which is “on my way home”

stays in default public.

there are no replacements. nothing as cool. but their models are default private.

connections breaking connections — accounts deleted.

there’s not    areaway good model right now for amknig stuff product.

their need to monetize this stuff eventually changes behavior.

All this stuff keeps showing up in public when one doesn’t mean it to.

privacy affects us on a person by person.

Data that never should’ve been there goes in there.

the default should be – don’t show this to the world.

sense of place. – read in college.

VCR shifting sense of time and place.

people need some sense of whether something is safe.

trust means – i can walk out of the house and have a sense that people wont steal my stuff…

or people eaving a social network and not having all of their secrets getting out.

I really miss the idea of friend being friend.

kids care about privacy in a  very granular way.

friendship is very granular.

@Dayn

Why is privacy hard? Granularity is complicated, security, & there is currently no model for making money on it. @hotdogsladies #webvisions

What kind of platform requires that your subscription is made public? not google reader, gmail, etc
january – zuckerberg interviewed by arrington – “if we were to create facebook new today, the current settings today would be how we built it now” (everything public by default) — see marshall’s post on “privacy is dead”
when people feel secure knowing how far their informatino will spread, they feel more comfortable sharing more informtaion
realtiy tv, twitter, myspace, letters to the editor of papers left in comments in news websites — general trend towards everything being public
less privacy -> more pageviews
one of the top results in google suggest for “how do i” is “delete my facebook account”
deleting your account is not easy to do
the most viable long-term solution is for social networking to be a protocol not a site. server-to-server communications. it’s inevitable. the alternative is to let the few big companies make the decisions.
Faceook –
Marhsalk’s
By defintion about observing others and comparing and contrasting
orgiinally
based on Harvard
the bulk it’s history was — narcissistic.
by default all of your stuff was there for friends
a number of friends was turned by default to public
people had never changedtheir privacy settings before…
some of it irretrievably public by defa

ult
the thing that pissed me off the most during that period

which of the setting bothered them the most
was the most that the fact that back then you brace a fan of paceges and that was the facebook version of subscribing by RSS
originally — that was something you could ckeep private — that makes snese to me –
as of december one of the changes was that it couldn’t bbe public — even if you were not logged in
could still see people’s fan pages
example i often gave was
“i’m secretly gay tanned no one at the office kows it”
a friend not in the tech sphere — told me — a fan of a podcast
heterosexual couples stuggling to concveive
but didn’t want the world at lease to see that podcast
but it was public from tha point on
iretrivably.fb is incredible in that its popularized the syndication of public content
what kind of subscription would require that your material was put public
another object was that your friends were irrevocably public as well.
day after that “don’t expose this on my profile”
but it was still avaialbe programmatically – -through the api.
the fact tha they enabled it — especially one day after the event
at least human invisible and not programmatically invisible.
Jan – mark zukerberg did an interview with micheal arrington
if we were to create facebook again today we’d have the same privacy settings as we do today. current settings today is code word for
zuckerberg says the age of privacy is dead. people join facebook to be public and not private
but for years — but facebook’s contribution
when people feel secure in where their data will go, they will be more willing to share information
then they feel comfortable sharing more information in total.
head of public comma at fb — public rationale for that — their evidence of the fact that the world was changing in th

at way as that the fact that reality tv shows were popular, and twitter was by nature public, and also letters to the editor about
why fb changed its privacy policy.
the more people share, the more pages will be read, and the more ads can be served.
less privacy means more pageviews –
helpful to spell out.
well demonstrated by the most recent
2 major things ppl objected to:
1. privileged partners — the fact that exposing your data
when you visit those sites, they look at your facebook cookie – and FB just gives them the data
yelp
pandora
docs.com (microsoft)
2. a much larger nu

a number of websites can be accessed via API level technology.
Facebook will give you an frame – that showed you
visit read white web so it would say – we can see who your friends are – view the articles on rrw –
facebook would serve it up through an frame — and you would click on features that other people have liked on RRW.
the opt out feature is a radical change — vs. opt in (w/facebook connect)
vs. facebook connect — you just “like” things. and that’s exposure of user data.
now yelp.com, ect is OPT OUT> this is dramatic — UI shift.
people are freaking out about all that. who are some of the people who have quit fb
peter rojas
matt cutts (!!)
leo laporte
they’ve quit bc of privacy concerns
“how do it” google
delete my fb account
—-
diaspora — NYU kids through kickstarter approaching 160,000
super geeky about it.

RRW wrote about them first. i don’t think they have any product at all
lots of other people are building decentralized open social networks.

he most viable
not for social networking
where it lives on your server of the server of trusted providers — all of our social networks are interoperable
how verizon customers can call att cusomers- and take our contacts from one network to another when we leave.
kind of inevitable that that will happen.
leave us subject to their policy changes – -putting everyday people at risk and unhappy. it’s a legit desire of ppl to want to communicate online with trusted friends and no one else.
everyone from marginalized populations to prevent from being exposed to everyone else. that’s a very legitimate need.
howfully social networking as a protocol will return control to users of this really revolutary technology back to the whole world.
now social networking has opened up social publishing to the world. a world changing kind of technology that people should be able to trust. because


Facebook executives are preparing for a ‘privacy summit’ to discuss the site’s controversial new default privacy settings (which do little to protect users’ privacy). But in a world of over-sharing online, does privacy even matter anymore? And have our notions of public and private changed so dramatically that we couldn’t reverse things if we wanted to?

Jeff Jarvis is a journalism professor at the City University of New York and author of “What Would Google Do?” He walks us through the history of privacy, and how technology has changed our definitions of what it is over the years.

And Amber Case is a cyborg-anthropologist and tech consultant. She explains how social networking sites have redefined privacy, identity, a

nd the way we interact with others.

Guests: Amber Case and Jeff Jarvis
Produced by: Kristen Meinzer and Jen Poyant

Download

Spark 114 – May 23 & 25, 2010

On this episode of Spark: Facebook privacy, video game localization, and universal translators. Click below to listen to the whole show, or

Recently, the popular social networking website Facebook changed its privacy policy. That has some people worried that once private information may now be public. Others ask, “What’s the big deal?” This week, Spark looks at Facebook and privacy from several perspectives.

First, Nora talked to Philip Moscovitch and Andrew Jones from the Spark community for their views on Facebook and privacy. (Runs 7:50)

Next, Nora interviewed David Wasieleski about this business ethics of social networking sites like Facebook. (Runs 7:01)

Finally, cyborg anthropologist Amber Case explains why Facebook is “sticky” and how its design decisions encourage participation. (Runs 8:10)

The second self. One must manage both the offline self and the online self. The outer appearance and security of the analog self must be updated an maintained. Clothing and skillets, house and vitamins. One cannot look out of date. The digital self must also maintain the extension of self. Sensors must be developed, even mentally, to ascertain where the boundaries of the digital body begin and end.

Security in real life

Security of the second self.

Thanks to everyone at CBC Radio, especially Carma Jolly, for making this an enjoyable experience!

Visualizing eComm and the Augmented Reality Conference 2010 with Stacked Graphs

Note: This is a content preview of a full resolution PDF report that will be made available on the site next week.

A stacked graph method is one way of displaying buzz around speakers and topics at conferences. I’ve been tracking conferences with stream/stacked graphs for the last two years.

In a way, the stacked graph is a more organic version of a bar graph, because it can be used to show an increase and decrease in volumes of conversation around a subject.

eComm Emerging Communications Conference - Augmented Reality Conference

What is This?

This is a stacked graph displaying Tweets associated with the #eComm and #arconf hashtags during the three days of San Francisco’s Emerging Communications Conference and the Augmented Reality Conference from 4/19/10-4/21/10.

The interesting part about visualizing data in this way is that it shows that there is an inherent difference between what a speaker says and what an audience “hears”. Hearing, in this case, is defined by how a speaker’s name, company, and words are picked up by microbloggers and re-tweeted online.

After looking at the full graph of the conference over three days, @anthropunk commented that while the streamgraph for #arconf was significantly larger than those for the other days, it did not necessarily mean that the first two days of the conference were not interesting, but that there were simply more people tweeting during the last day of the conference.

History

Until recently, I used a Java applet that only queried the last 1000 tweets associated with a word. A month ago, stacked graph creator Lee Byron, released his source code, allowing Nathan Bergey to build an open source version of the Neoformix Twitter Stream Graph. Aaron Parecki was whitelisted on the Twitter API, and their combined capabilities allowed for a greater level of data visualization to occur.

Now we all have an excellent way to visualize Tweets associated with conference hashtags. This method of data visualization is an improvement on a the process I used to visualize the Internet Strategy Forum Summit 2009 and the Internet Strategy Forum 2008.

This project was originally inspired by the Neoformix Twitter Stream graph. It was a clunky, limited machine programmed in Java. After several requests for the source code, we were forced to make our own. The result is a much better, lighter, and faster loading system that has a linear time scale. Nathan Bergey was the force behind this. He created a Python Stream Graph Library that Aaron Parecki was able to use to make the graphs.

Stream Graphs and Wordle Clouds

A stacked graph shows the same data as a Wordle graph, but adds an axis of time.

The conference visualization is split up into sections according to time. Each day and time period has two graphs associated with it. One is the stacked graph, and the other is a Wordle graph. The stacked graph shows time and volume, while the Worlde simply shows volume.

Monday, April 19th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/2010

Morning

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Morning 4/19/10

8:45:00 AM

Introduction

Hello and Welcome (Replacement)

Doc Searls, Harvard University/UC Santa Barbara

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM
Keynote
The Future of P2P
Eric Klinker, Bit Torrent

9:00:00 – 9:22:30 AM, Salon E

9:22:30 AM
Keynote
Communications Heading Into The Cloud
Craig Walker, Google

9:22:30 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Keynote

The National Broadband Plan and the Future of the Internet

Carlos Kirjner, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

9:45:00 – 10:07:30 AM, Salon E

10:07:30 AM

Keynote

The Rise of the Open Network: Or How I was David Isenberged into Submission

JP Rangaswami, British Telecom/Ribbit

10:07:30 – 10:30:00 AM, Salon E

10:30:00 AM

Break

Morning Break

11:15:00 AM

Keynote

Social Sharing 2.0: The Rise of Real-Time

Jonathan Rosenberg, Skype

11:15:00 – 11:35:00 AM, Salon E

11:35:00 AM

Keynote

Identity for Global Communication

Cullen Jennings, Cisco

11:35:00 – 11:55:00 AM, Salon E

11:55:00 AM

An Anthropologist’s Eye for the Tech Guy: Emerging Market Opportunities in a Post-BRIC World

Dawn Nafus, Intel

11:55:00 – 12:10:00 PM, Salon E

12:10:00 PM

Launch

Ringio Launch

Michael Zirngibl, Ringio

12:10:00 – 12:17:30 PM, Salon E

12:17:30 PM

Launch

CounterPath Launch

Donovan Jones, CounterPath

12:17:30 – 12:25:00 PM, Salon E

12:25:00 PM

Launch

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Telio Launch

Alan Duric, Telio

12:25:00 – 12:32:30 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/19/2010

2:00:00 PM


The Future of Mobile Networks: Offloading Congested Mobile Networks with a Software-Only Approach

Elad Barkan, Bzeek

2:00:00 – 2:10:00 PM, Salon E

2:10:00 PM

How Open Data and the Gov 2.0 Movement are Changing Communications With Government

Mark Headd, Tele-Works, Inc.

2:10:00 – 2:20:00 PM, Salon E

2:20:00 PM

Keynote

What Can Cities be Like When Everything Talks

Assaf Biderman, MIT

2:20:00 – 2:40:00 PM, Salon E

2:40:00 PM

Lightning Talk

With 500 Ways to Communicate, Why Should a Customer Choose Your New Offering?

Jared Goralnick, AwayFind

2:40:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

Orbiting Data Centers for Global Connectivity

Keith Lofstrom, Server Sky

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

Your Reality is Augmented

Benjamin Joffe, +8*

3:00:00 – 3:15:00 PM, Salon E

3:15:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Evening

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/19/2010

4:00:00 PM

Keynote

Making Music with the World on the iPad and iPhone

Ge Wang, Smule/Stanford

4:00:00 – 4:30:00 PM, Salon E

4:30:00 PM

Mobile Video Communication – iPhone & Android Lead the Way

Jan Linden, Global IP Solutions

4:30:00 – 4:45:00 PM, Salon E

4:45:00 PM

Recombinant Communications Manifesto: Piecing Together the Disaggregated Infrastructure

Dan Miller, Opus Research

4:45:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

Disruption and Death: Telephony, Open Platform and Network APIs

Oren Michels, Mashery

5:00:00 – 5:15:00 PM, Salon E

5:15:00 PM

Evolution of Mobile Applications: Role of WebKit and High-End Browsers

Benoit Schillings, Myriad Group AG

5:15:00 – 5:30:00 PM, Salon E

5:30:00 PM

Designing For The Future

Julia Tsao, yU+co/Fair Enough
5:30:00 – 5:40:00 PM, Salon E
5:40:00 PM

STATUS: Bringing User Presence To The Voice World

Zhao Lu, Orange Labs

5:40:00 – 5:50:00 PM, Salon E

5:50:00 PM

Keynote

(Moved to Tuesday 10:00-10:15, Due To Volcanic Ash) Cloud Communications and How to Destroy a $700bn Industry for Fun and Profit

Martin Geddes, Independent

5:50:00 – 6:05:00 PM, Salon E

5:50:00 PM

Beyond Voice – Designing an Open Communications Platform (Moved Into Slot, Due To Volcanic Ash)

Jose de Castro, Voxeo

5:50:00 – 6:05:00 PM, Salon E

6:05:00 PM

Keynote

Macro Trends and Predictions in Mobile Broadband (Calling In Due To Volcanic Ash)

Moray Rumney, Agilent

6:05:00 – 6:25:00 PM, Salon E

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/20/2010

eComm Wordle Graph Entire Day 4/20/2010

Morning

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/20/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/20/2010

8:45:00 AM

Introduction

Introductions (Replacement)

Benoit Schillings, Myriad Group AG

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM

Keynote

Infrastructure Shift: The Long-Term Challenge of Change

John Hagel, LLP Center for the Edge

9:00:00 – 9:30:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Beyond Squeezing Lemons: The Future of Collaborative Business Models

Anders Sundelin, CIP

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

Managing Growth and Profits in the Yottabyte Era (Replacement)

Chetan Sharma, Chetan Sharma Consulting

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Customer Experience in the Call Center: Can the Leaks in the Pipeline be Fixed?

Shai Berger, F?nolo

9:45:00 – 10:00:00 AM, Salon E

10:00:00 AM

(Moved to Monday 17:50-18:05, Due To Volcanic Ash) Beyond Voice – Designing an Open Communications Platform

Jose de Castro, Voxeo

10:00:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:00:00 AM

Cloud Communications and How to Destroy a $700bn Industry for Fun and Profit (Moved Into Slot, Due To Volcanic Ash)

Martin Geddes, Independent

10:00:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:15:00 AM

Break

Morning Break

11:00:00 AM

Yesterday’s Wire for Tomorrow’s Apps?

Brian Harris, New Mexico Attorney General

11:00:00 – 11:15:00 AM, Salon E

11:15:00 AM

Internet Gone Mobile

Richard Bennett, ITIF

11:15:00 – 11:30:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Ubiquitous Collaboration: The Next Wave of Productivity?

Joe Burton, Cisco

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

Teleku :: Cloud Communications (Replacement)

Chris Matthieu, GetVocal

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

Keynote

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Our National Broadband Plan: The End of the Beginning?

Richard Whitt, Google

11:45:00 – 12:05:00 PM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

Yeah I’m Stuck Too (Replacement)

Patrick Murphy, VoiceSage

11:45:00 – 12:00:00 PM, Salon E

12:00:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Moderator Introduction

Brough Turner, Ashtonbrooke

12:00:00 – 12:07:00 PM, Salon E

12:07:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Paul Brigner Introduction

Paul Brigner, Verizon

12:07:00 – 12:09:00 PM, Salon E

12:09:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Susan Estrada Introduction

Susan Estrada, FirstMile.US

12:09:00 – 12:11:00 PM, Salon E

12:11:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Tracy Rosenberg Introduction

Tracy Rosenberg, Media Alliance

12:11:00 – 12:13:00 PM, Salon E

12:13:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Richard Bennett Introduction

Richard Bennett, ITIF

12:13:00 – 12:15:00 PM, Salon E

12:15:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan

Brough Turner, Ashtonbrooke

12:15:00 – 12:35:00 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/20/2010

eComm Wordle Graph Afternoon 4/20/2010

2:00:00 PM

Panel

Walk-On Panel

You!

2:00:00 – 2:30:00 PM, Salon E

2:30:00 PM

Participatory Sensing

Deborah Estrin, UCLA Computer Science Department

2:30:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

Mapping Mobile Social Networks with NodeXL: Finding Key Users, Groups, and Locations

Marc A Smith, ConnectedAction

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

The 6th Sense Accelerator: When Mobile Meets Intuition

Barak Hachamov, My6sense

3:00:00 – 3:15:00 PM, Salon E

3:15:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Evening

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/20/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/20/2010

4:00:00 PM

Bring Your Own Wireless: How Smart Mobile Phones are Revolutionizing Wireline Customers

Piers Finlayson, Metaswitch

4:00:00 – 4:15:00 PM, Salon E

4:15:00 PM

Everything You Think You Know About High Performance Military Communications is Wrong

Tom Katis, RebelVox

4:15:00 – 4:30:00 PM, Salon E

4:30:00 PM

Keynote

Smart People, Dumb Objects, Networked Environments

Usman Haque, Pachube/Connected Environments

4:30:00 – 4:50:00 PM, Salon E

4:50:00 PM

From Distraction to Real Life, Humanizing our Mobile Future

Kristian Simsarian, IDEO

4:50:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

A Glimpse Into the Future if XMPP and Wave are Successful

Jason Kolb, Cisco

5:00:00 – 5:15:00 PM, Salon E

5:15:00 PM

A Telephone System for the Next Three Billion

David A. Burgess, Kestrel Signal Processing

5:15:00 – 5:30:00 PM, Salon E

5:30:00 PM

Demo

Towards Painless, Free, Open Phone Data

Troy Davis, Cloudvox

5:30:00 – 5:40:00 PM, Salon E

5:40:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Introduction

Mike Rowehl, Mobile Monday Silicon Valley

5:40:00 – 5:42:00 PM, Salon E

5:42:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – CrowdScanner

Adrian Avendano, Meetforeal & CrowdScanner

5:42:00 – 5:45:00 PM, Salon E

5:45:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Aloqa

Sanjeev Agrawal, Aloqa

5:45:00 – 5:48:00 PM, Salon E

5:48:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – My6sense

Barak Hachamov, My6sense

5:48:00 – 5:51:00 PM, Salon E

5:51:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Waze

Di-Ann Eisnor, Waze

5:51:00 – 5:54:00 PM, Salon E

5:54:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Trippo VoiceMagix

Kimmo Sainio, Cellictica

5:54:00 – 5:57:00 PM, Salon E

5:57:00 PM

The Information in Everything: The Augmented Future of Communications

Adam Broitman, Circ.us

5:57:00 – 6:12:00 PM, Salon E

6:12:00 PM

Lightning Talk

Walk and Talk: Augmenting Conversation

Phil Wolff, Reef9 Media

6:12:00 – 6:17:00 PM, Salon E

6:20:00 PM

Event

Free Drinks Social Networking


Wednesday, April 21th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Entire Day 4/19/10

Morning

eComm Stream Graph Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Morning 4/19/10

8:30:00 AM

Introduction

Introductions (Replacement)

Christine Perey, Perey Research & Consulting

8:30:00 – 8:45:00 AM, Salon E

8:45:00 AM

Sci-Fi to Sci-Fact: How Computer Vision Will Change AR and the World

Ben Newhouse, Yelp

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM

Keynote

Searches Originating Inside and Outside of your Head

Hartmut Neven, Google

9:00:00 – 9:30:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

Generating Revenues with Mobile AR: The Ecosystem, Business Models and Metrics

Christine Perey, Perey Research & Consulting

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Keynote

Bridging the Gap Between Desktop and Mobile Augmented Reality

Blake Callens, Zugara

9:45:00 – 10:05:00 AM, Salon E

10:05:00 AM

What’s Wrong With ‘Reality’?

Usman Haque, Pachube/Connected Environments

10:05:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:15:00 AM

Break

Morning Break


Late Morning

eComm Wordle Graph Late Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Late Morning 4/19/10

11:00:00 AM

A View to a Future; Beyond the Hype of Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

Dana Farbo, Acrossair

11:00:00 – 11:15:00 AM, Salon E

11:15:00 AM

User Experience: A Possible Roadblock to AR Adoption

Tony Fernandes, The UE Group

11:15:00 – 11:30:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

Context Is King: AR, Salience, and the Constant Next Scenario

Clark Dodsworth, Osage Associates Consulting

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

The Wizard is Us: Symbiogenesis by Networking Part 1

Arturo Sinclair, Digital Worlds Institute

11:45:00 – 11:52:50 AM, Salon E

11:52:50 AM

The Wizard is Us: Symbiogenesis by Networking Part 2

Anton Yudin, Digital Worlds Institute

11:52:50 – 12:00:00 PM, Salon E

12:00:00 PM

Applying WWW Best Practices to AR

Erik Bovee, Mobilizy

12:00:00 – 12:15:00 PM, Salon E

12:15:00 PM

Where AR We Heading?

Steven Feiner, Columbia University

12:15:00 – 12:30:00 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stream Graph Afternoon 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Afternoon 4/19/10

2:00:00 PM

Advancing the Business of AR, A Practical, Commercial Solution

Pamela Kerwin, GeoVector

2:00:00 – 2:15:00 PM, Salon E

2:15:00 PM

Who Will Own Our Augmented Reality?

Anselm Hook, Meedan

2:15:00 – 2:25:00 PM, Salon E

2:25:00 PM

Mobile Augmented Reality: The World Is Your Playground

Brian Selzer, Ogmento

2:25:00 – 2:35:00 PM, Salon E

2:35:00 PM

Spatial Computing: Designing an Interface for our Bodies

Albert Hwang, phedhex.com

2:35:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

AR Today and Tomorrow

Bruno Uzzan, Total Immersion

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

Advancing AR – Beyond Labels

Ivan Franco, YDreams

3:00:00 – 3:10:00 PM, Salon E

3:10:00 PM

Junaio and the Unifeye SDK Mobile Development Platform

Peter Meier, metaio GmbH

3:10:00 – 3:25:00 PM, Salon E

3:25:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Early Evening

eComm Wordle Graph Early Evening 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Early Evening 4/19/10

4:00:00 PM

Keynote

Future Vision: Decade of Ubiquity (Augmented Reality 2010-2020)

Robert Rice, Neogence Enterprises

4:00:00 – 4:20:00 PM, Salon E

4:20:00 PM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Visual Recognition, the Future of Mobile AR browsers

David Marimon, Telefonica R&D

4:20:00 – 4:35:00 PM, Salon E

4:20:00 PM

Augmented Reality & The Venture Capital Community

David Blumberg, Blumberg Capital

4:20:00 – 4:35:00 PM, Salon E

4:35:00 PM

Seeing the Future of AR Through Digital Eyewear

Yohan Baillot, (Independent)

4:35:00 – 4:45:00 PM, Salon E

4:45:00 PM

Eyeborg – Terminator Lives

Rob Spence, Eyeborg Project

4:45:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

Keynote

Strange Days. How the Computing Experience is Turning Inside Out

Mark Rolston, frog design

5:00:00 – 5:20:00 PM, Salon E

5:20:00 PM

Break

Late Afternoon Break


Late Evening

eComm Stream Graph Evening 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Evening 4/19/10

5:45:00 PM

Story as Software

John du Pre Gauntt, Media Dojo

5:45:00 – 6:00:00 PM, Salon E

6:00:00 PM

Solid to Liquid to Air: Cyborg Anthropology and the Future of the Interface

Amber Case, CyborgCamp

6:00:00 – 6:15:00 PM, Salon E

6:15:00 PM

Navigation Rising! A Deep Look at Live Mapping and Augmented Reality in the Car

Di-Ann Eisnor, Waze

6:15:00 – 6:30:00 PM, Salon E

6:30:00 PM

Building Business Models Around Augmented Reality

Matthew Szymczyk, Zugara

6:30:00 – 6:45:00 PM, Salon E

6:45:00 PM

Building Mobile Augmented Reality Applications with 3DAR

Mark Anderson, Bordertown Labs

6:45:00 – 7:00:00 PM, Salon E

7:00:00 PM

AR and the Mass-Market Business Opportunity

Matt Miesnieks, Layar

7:00:00 – 7:10:00 PM, Salon E

7:10:00 PM

Liberating AR from Basemaps, Markers and Overlays

Eric Kabisch, University of California, Department of Informatics

7:10:00 – 7:22:30 PM, Salon E

7:22:30 PM

Vision Based Mobile AR – A New User Interface For Mobile Applications?

Michael Gervautz, Qualcomm

7:22:30 – 7:35:00 PM, Salon E

7:35:00 PM

The Future of Augmented Reality

Steve Hoffman, ThinkHuge

7:35:00 – 7:50:00 PM, Salon E

7:50:00 PM

Event

Free Drinks Social Networking


Conclusions

Credits:

This image was created by Nathan Bergey (@natronics) and Aaron Parecki (@aaronpk). Aaron took data from the Twitter API and passed it through Nathan’s Python Twitter stacked graph library. This image excludes the actual “#ecomm” and &quote;#arconf” terms leaving more room for the other terms to show through.

About

Stacked Graph History
Here’s a link to Lee Byron’s original Stacked Graph paper, “Stacked Graphs – Geometry & Aesthetics” www.leebyron.com/else/streamgraph/

“streamgraph_generator” can be checked out from github.

You can make these as well by downloading @natronic’s Python Stream Graph Library on GitHub.

Get the StreamGraph Python Code on Github

—–

About

Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist living and working in Portland, Oregon. You can follow her on Twitter at @caseorganic.

CyborgCamp ’10 Planning Meeting – Tuesday, 01/19/10, 7–9pm

Great News! The next CyborgCamp will be in early May of 2010. That means its time to start planning!

cyborgcamp-2010-planning

This meeting is everyone’s chance to brainstorm on location ideas, sponsors and speakers. What kinds of topics are of interest to you? How has the idea of Cyborg evolved over the last year? What new kinds of technologies have arrived on the scene?

We’ll discuss volunteers and the wiki too. Come along, especially if you helped make CyborgCamp PDX ’08 so excellent in the first place. Bring snacks and drinks to share with others.

This planning meeting will most likely be followed by general networking and fun at a local haunt.

RSVP on Upcoming.org

Where:

AboutUs.org

107 SE Washington Street, Suite 520
Portland Oregon 97214
United States

When:

Tuesday, January 19, 2010 from 7–9pm

What is CyborgCamp?

CyborgCamp is an unconference about the future of the relationship between humans and technology. We’ll discuss topics such as social media, design, code, inventions, web 2.0, twitter, the future of communication, cyborg technology, anthropology, psychology, and philosophy.

CyborgCamp’s aim is to have many communication channels, such as Twitter, Flickr, UstreamTV, Video and Audio recordings and live chats displayed on the screen.
Why May 2010? In March 2010, CyborgCamp will make its way to Brazil and back before landing again in Portland, Oregon for its second year.

Questions? Contact Amber Case @caseorganic or MJ @mama_j.

You can also follow @cyborgcamp on Twitter for updates.

Cyborg Anthropology at BoCo – A Fusion of Tech, Music and Food in Boulder, Colorado

boco-boulder-music-tech-food

Today I was excited to speak at BoCo, a great new conference developed by the Boulder Tech Community, especially Andrew Hyde. Rick Turoczy was there, among other awesome Portlanders, San Fransiscans, and Boulderites. It  was a sunny day and there were beautiful mountains all around. The morning sessions dealt with food and music and were very wonderful to listen to.

spacesuit-as-cyborg

I spoke about Cyborg Anthropology, which is the study of human computer interactions and how technology affects the way in which we communicate with one another.

We Are All Cyborgs

When you read this, you are acting as a low-tech cyborg, because you are using a computer to view text that I have written. My writing is stored here in my website, part of my actor network of external technological devices that, when taken together, comprise my technosocial self. As cavemen, we began skipping evolution by crafting spears instead of growing teeth. We began making hammers as extensions of our fists.

caveman-cyborg-anthropology-boco

My social self is part technology and part human. My technological self does a lot of networking for me through my social networking profiles and my Google search results. So do yours (if you have them). My technosocial avatar of a self networks for me when I’m not there.

Distributed Social Selves

Each piece of my distributed social identity leaves a geological trail of past self that my present self can interact with. These all comprise my future self, which your future self or selves will most undoubtedly interact with. The online optimization of self, when coupled with the analog optimization of self (i.e. real-life networking, person to person) is the creation of a stable identity that is uniformly distributed and presented all over the web.

Technology Resembles Magic

Technology is almost magical. Like the scrying pool of the past (or of fantasy novels), the iPhone or computer monitor allows us to view anything anywhere in the world through YouTube and Twitter, News sites and Facebook. We can summon up an image with a simple spell (a simple text entry into Google search or Twitter search) and we can extend our speech and ears across very large distances in seconds with the mere touch of a button.

Technology Gives Us Superpowers

Technology, when used well, gives us amazing superpowers. We are like gods, until we forget to charge our batteries. We are like gods, until we forget to upgrade our devices to the most recent operating system or device number. Our external prosthetic devices turn against us when they get old. Our old clothes go out of style. Our brick phones make us get laughed at in the streets.

From Physical Transportation to Mental Transportation

In the same way that cars transport our physical bodies, computers and cell phones transport our spiritual bodies. Don’t like the word spiritual? Use the word mind instead. We’re increasingly entering into a world of mental machines – mental transportation devices. These devices transmit our thoughts invisibly to others. They are taking up smaller amounts of space, until vehicles, who require increasingly large highways.

Mental Traffic Jams

We have traffic jams, too. Mental traffic jams. Jams on Twitter. Twitter fails. Rush hour around important events and deaths and wars and crises. We can now have multiple views of the same event.

Telephonic Schizophrenia

When telephone technology first came out, people felt it was crazy. The idea of going into a room and speaking into a machine sounded schizophrenic.

history-of-the-landline-boco

More

There is more: enough to fill up a hour and a half speech, but I’ll leave that to you to see the next time I speak. Until then, you can follow me on Twitter @caseorganic, or you can check out BoCo.

Tracking the Internet Strategy Forum 2009

internet-strategy-forum-portland-2009

If there’s a Portland conference this summer that you don’t want to miss, it’s Portland’s Internet Strategy Forum. Where else will you be able to meet top-level experts and analysts like Jeremiah Owyang of Forrester Research, or Katherine Durham, VP of Marketing at Hewlett-Packard?

For less than $200, you gain access to a class of experts that will only be in Portland for a day.

Event Tracking with StreamGraphs

Last year, I used StreamGraphs to visually track buzz around Internet Strategy Forum 2008. This method allowed me to see which speakers had the most audience support and interest. This year, I’ll be doing the same thing, and my results will be made available two days after the conference (check back here for a complete report).

Neoformix Graph for the Internet Stragety Forum

Follow the Visualization

If you want to follow my progress as I track and visualize the conference, feel free to follow me on Twitter @caseorganic, or subscribe to Hazelnut Tech Talk by RSS.

Event Details

The conference occurs on Friday, July 24th from 8:30Am – 5:00 Pm, and check-in begins at 8:15 Am. If you don’t yet have a ticket, you can get one at the Internet Strategy Forum website. The conference will be located at the Governor Hotel, which is at 614 SW 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97205.

Out of Town?

You can attend Internet Strategy Forum remotely too, and the cost is just $175.00.

Need More Information?

For more information, call 971-223-3838 or E-mail events@internetstrategyforum.org

Speaker Bio – Jeremiah Owyang

Jeremiah Owyang is a leading research analyst in the social computing industry and is the author of the influential Web Strategist blog. He ranks #2 on the Twitter Power 150 list.

jeremiah-owyang-internet-strategy-forum

TOPIC: The Future of the Social Web (based on new Forrester report)
Although social networks have caught the attention of brands and consumers, today’s social landscape is a primitive series of unconnected islands. Expect new technologies to emerge that connect all systems and communities together –that allow communities to spread and share from one another. This simple technology changes the web landscape as consumers rely on their peers to make decisions, any web experience can now be personalized, and social networks become as powerful as CRM systems. Marketers must be ready for the drastic changes to come as power shifts to micro-celebrities, communities, and social networks –not traditional marketing. Jeremiah’s presentation will cover these changes in detail.

Speaker Bio – Katherine Durham

Katherine Durham is the IPG-A Vice President of Marketing. In this role she is responsible for building the HP brand and driving demand for imaging and printing products with Consumer, SMB, Enterprise and Public Sector segments across the U.S., Canada and Latin America. In addition she is responsible for Environmental Leadership — compliance, sales support and marketing — across the Americas.

Since joining HP in 2000, Durham has held a number of positions in the Americas marketing organization. From 2005-2007 Durham was the Director of Business Planning, Market Insight and Operations where she re-architected the market insight team to deliver more differentiated customer insights, established TALC (technology adoption lifecycle) for the region and built a global delivery team in India. Before that Durham was the Director of Communications for IPG’s consumer and commercial business as well as the PSG’s consumer businesses, responsible for advertising, in-store execution, on-line communications, events and more. Durham also held roles as the e-marketing manager and NA brand manager for IPG-A Marketing.

Kent Lewis recently interviewed Katherine Durham about her keynote at Internet Strategy Forum.

Credits

Photo of Jeremiah Owyang courtesy of brad_crooks.

You can register for Internet Strategy Forum 2009, or learn more at the Internet Strategy Forum website.

—–

Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist and New Media Consultant based in Portland, Oregon and elsewhere. You can follow her on Twitter or Contact her at caseorganic at gmail dot com. She wrote her thesis on how mobile phones and their growing role in human interaction. Read The Cell Phone and Its Technosocial Sites of Engagement.