iPad-based ordering system at a sushi restaurant in a Singapore train station. A bit about mobile ordering systems in Asia: this kind of ordering system is relatively common in Tokyo and Singapore. I encountered a similar one in Beijing. I saw some older systems in use in Japan that used NEC Computer Handhelds (that looked like Pokedex!). These were used by waitresses to send orders to the kitchen and quickly print receipts. Japanese Ramen restaurants are known for having vending machines for meal purchases. Order your food like you would a soft drink in the States. Just press a button with the picture of the ramen dish you’d like. A ticket gets dispensed, and you take a seat and give the ticket to the cook! I wish there were systems like this in America, but there are complications around having lots of devices connected at once in restaurants. If anyone has more information on this, please let me know! #mobile #restaurant #ordering #asia #singapore #ipad #sushi


iPad-based ordering system at a sushi restaurant in a Singapore train station.
A bit about mobile ordering systems in Asia: this kind of ordering system is relatively common in Tokyo and Singapore. I encountered a similar one in Beijing.
I saw some older systems in use in Japan that used NEC Computer Handhelds (that looked like Pokedex!). These were used by waitresses to send orders to the kitchen and quickly print receipts.
Japanese Ramen restaurants are known for having vending machines for meal purchases. Order your food like you would a soft drink in the States. Just press a button with the picture of the ramen dish you’d like. A ticket gets dispensed, and you take a seat and give the ticket to the cook!
I wish there were systems like this in America, but there are complications around having lots of devices connected at once in restaurants. If anyone has more information on this, please let me know!
#mobile #restaurant #ordering #asia #singapore #ipad #sushi

iPad-based ordering system at a sushi restaurant in a Singapore train station. A bit about mobile ordering systems in Asia: this kind of ordering system is relatively common in Tokyo and Singapore. I encountered a similar one in Beijing. I saw some older systems in use in Japan that used NEC Computer Handhelds (that looked like Pokedex!). These were used by waitresses to send orders to the kitchen and quickly print receipts. Japanese Ramen restaurants are known for having vending machines for meal purchases. Order your food like you would a soft drink in the States. Just press a button with the picture of the ramen dish you’d like. A ticket gets dispensed, and you take a seat and give the ticket to the cook! I wish there were systems like this in America, but there are complications around having lots of devices connected at once in restaurants. If anyone has more information on this, please let me know! #mobile #restaurant #ordering #asia #singapore #ipad #sushi


iPad-based ordering system at a sushi restaurant in a Singapore train station.
A bit about mobile ordering systems in Asia: this kind of ordering system is relatively common in Tokyo and Singapore. I encountered a similar one in Beijing.
I saw some older systems in use in Japan that used NEC Computer Handhelds (that looked like Pokedex!). These were used by waitresses to send orders to the kitchen and quickly print receipts.
Japanese Ramen restaurants are known for having vending machines for meal purchases. Order your food like you would a soft drink in the States. Just press a button with the picture of the ramen dish you’d like. A ticket gets dispensed, and you take a seat and give the ticket to the cook!
I wish there were systems like this in America, but there are complications around having lots of devices connected at once in restaurants. If anyone has more information on this, please let me know!
#mobile #restaurant #ordering #asia #singapore #ipad #sushi

Geoloqi Open Data Hackathon at Upstart Labs Friday, Nov. 18, 2011 – Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011!

Come hack on open gov datasets and Geoloqi! We moved into an new office space! We’re sharing it with Upstart Labs, a great new company from the founders of StepChange group (recently acquired by Dachis Group).

We’ll have food and drinks, and plenty of interesting things to discuss and work on. The new office has two war rooms for planning and plenty of space for hacking and discussion.

Thanks to our wonderful local sponsors who will be providing food and drink! That’s CivicApps for lunch, and Thetus Group for breakfast! Geoloqi will be providing beer and refreshments, and Stumptown will be providing coffee!

When?

Friday, Nov. 18, 2011 from 6:30Pm-9:00Pm – Setup and Planning (including beer and snacks)

Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011 from 9:30Am-6:00Pm – Hacking and Presentations (including breakfast, lunch and snacks).

Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011 (optional day for additional hacking!).

Where?

Upstart Labs / Geoloqi HQ
500 NW 9th Ave, Portland, OR 97209


View Larger Map

Full Schedule

Friday:
6:30Pm-9:00Pm – Hacking, planning and drinks begin!

Saturday:
9:30-10:00Am – Registration, breakfast and coffee.
10:00Am-10:15Am – Attendee short presentations. Groups and individuals set up to hack. Ideas are tossed around.
10:15Am – Hacking Begins!
12:00Pm – Lunch and snacks arrive!
01:00Pm – Hacking continues
05:00Pm – Presentations, and dinner on your own!
06:00Pm – Hack late into the night if you wish.

Sunday:
10Am – Optional day if you want to continue building your layer or app! We’ll be at the office until 6:00Pm to help you out.

RSVP

While the event is free, we’ll want to make sure we have food and drinks for everyone. RSVP on Plancast!, or check out the event on Calagator! We look forward to seeing you there!

The Need for Superhuman Interaction Design

Here I’d like to rant about something that’s been bothering me for a long time. Skeuomorphs and their contributions to friction-filled, annoying interfaces. This reduces the ability for people to feel like superhumans when they use an interface. If you already know what a skeuomorph is, skip down to “The Most Annoying Skeuomorphs”.

What is a Skeuomorph?

“an element of design or structure that serves little or no purpose in the artifact fashioned from the new material but was essential to the object made from the original material.

Basalla, George (1988). The Evolution of Technology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 107. ISBN 0-521-29681-1.

“a derivative object that retains ornamental design cues to a structure that was necessary in the original”.

The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press, 1971. Volume II, page 4064.

Skeuomorphs in the Wild

When done well, a skeuomorph helps a user to feel comfortable with an interface. Slight textures in digital interfaces help them to feel tactile. Good skeuomorph take cues from an analog world to help a user navigate a digital one. when done poorly, the skeuomorph forces the user to deal with an interface in an outdated way by blatantly ignoring the fact that the interaction is being done on a platform that is capable of handling new and improved interactions.

The Most Annoying Skeuomorphs

There is one place in particular where skeuomorphs aggravate me the most. This is the book reader or “page turn” skeuomorph. A book in real life takes some effort to hold, and some effort to flip a page. Many designers keep this effort around when they translate a book into a digital format. This results in the following annoying user interface experiences. Have you ever tried one of these badly designed pager turners out? When you try to flip the page, you have to physically press down on it and drag it over to the other side of the screen! And this is supposed to help people relax and enjoy reading on a digital device! Not if I have anything to do with it.

I first struggled with these annoying interfaces that blossomed during the 2000’s with the advent of quick Flash design. One or two people figured out how to program a page turner, released a tutorial and everyone was off to the races to copy it. The problem did not solve itself when the iPad came out. Instead, users saw and unfortunately experienced a increased bevy of ostentatious and distracting skeuomorphs. Things that made them feel bad while using a device.

Superhuman Interaction Design

Look at this interface for Flipboard. When you use it, you get an entire new page of content with the touch of a finger. Content pre-loads on either side in a visually pleasing way, taking a neurologically stressful set of RSS feeds and presenting them in a way in which the human has implied control over the data.

Flipboard presents a very important turning point in Skeuomorphic interaction design. It takes the best parts of the page turn, reduces them by half (the page pivots from the middle, not the side) and presents the reader with more information instantly. It is seamless. It is empowering. And because of that, it is relaxing.

People are excited to use Flipboard because it is not just a mentally joyful experience, but a physiologically joyful one as well. It is because of this that I consider Flipboard to be a part of what I’m calling “superhuman interaction design”. In order for an interface to be considered superhuman, it has to have the following characteristics:

  • Minimize visual skeuomorphic cues and reduce the interaction to action ratio. Flipboard reduces the page curl to a centralized pivot, and allows a page to be turned with the touch of a finger.
  • Make the user feel physiologically empowered. Present information in a way that makes the user feel more powerful than the information, not overwhelmed.
  • Make the user feel exhilarated when using the interface, as if they had suddently turned into a superhuman and they are able to do this because you’ve made them an excellent interface that empowers them instead of frightens them and makes them run away from data.

Other Superhuman Interfaces

Do you know of any other superhuman interfaces? I really like Skitch for its ability to quickly capture and store information, as well as it’s slick flipping interface. Least stressful tool on my machine.

JumpCut allows one to store up to 50 clipboard objects and access them with a tiny set of keyboard shortcuts. The interface is invisible until one needs it. It makes me feel like my short term memory is suddenly 50 memories long, instead of just 4 or 5.

DATE CHANGED: The Art of Pop Tech Marketing: 2011 Mobile Technology Event

The Art of Pop Tech Marketing 2011

Want to learn more about the hottest trends in mobile, what futuristic things you can do right now, and what others are doing with mobile in Portland?

On March 8th, 2011 Elliott Design Inc. will be putting on an event for technology enthusiasts and marketers at Migration Brewery from 1:30-5:30Pm. The event will feature four speakers from the local tech community, and theme of the event will be new and current mobile technologies and opportunities. The event is made possible by Verizon, Code Monkeys and Umbrella Web Solutions. The event is $49 and you can register for The Art of Pop Tech here.

Event Date and Location

March 8th, 2011
1:30pm-5:30pm

Location: Migration Brewery
2828 NE Glisan Street
Portland, OR

Sandwich and beverage included

Speakers

Amber Case, @caseorganic

TED talks speaker, Cyborg Anthropologist and Co founder of Geoloqi.com, Amber Case will be speaking on the History and Future of popular technology.

Chris Skaag, @thecodemonkeys

Award winning mobile app developer of G:into The Rain and Wildfire Fighter will speak on the importance of mobile apps and why they are changing the way we use the internet.

Lynn Gray

Northwest Agent for Priority Payment Systems, Lynn Gray will be speaking on Mobile Payment Solutions

Dan Delmain, @dandelmain

Owner and force behind SEO and Search Engine Marketing firm Umbrella Web Solutions, Dan Delmain will be talking about techniques for targeting the mobile market through search engines and local maps.

Don Elliott, @elliottdesign

President of Elliott Design, Don will wrap up the seminar with useful tools for popular technology.

See you there!

Ready to go? Register here to attend!