The Fourth Portland Data Visualization Group | Wednesday July 28, 2010: 6:30–9Pm at Webtrends

It’s time for another Portland Data Visualization Meetup! The last one occurred on Thurs, April 29. We’ll have three to four main presentations and networking time. Webtrends will again graciously host us on their top floor.

Michael Paukner - Data Visualization

Current speakers for Data Viz #4:


1. Periscopic will present two pieces of data visualization they’ve done.

The first is Vote Smart – a new visualization & voter’s assistant tool that uses data
from Project Vote Smart, and Open Secrets.  Designed to help you find out
which candidates are most like you. 10 min presentation plus 15-20 minutes for questions.

State of the Polar Bear – visual designs for a project that is still in development.  Half infographic movie, and half exploratory visualization.  Designed to raise awareness about CO2 levels and how that affects polar bears and arctic sea ice.  5-10 min presentation and
10-15 mins for questions.

2. Aaron Parecki and Amber Case will present new data from a project they’ve been working on dealing with GPS and SMS data called Geoloqi.com. They may also present a visualization of wiki commits to cyborganthropology.com over time.

3. A number of Portland Data Viz group members recently attended a Tufte lecture, which most everyone found to be very useful! Joe, a Portland Data Viz member, enjoyed the blot maps presented by Tufte. He will give a very short presentation on them. It will include a guide on how to build your own from US Geographic boundary files, as well as a discussion on Tufte’s criticism of this data visualization method.

Who Should Go?

The event is open to everyone interested in or working in the field of data visualization. This means designers, programmers, information architects, data miners, anthropologists, ect. We’re expecting a similar amount of people to last time (probably around 20-30 people).

Location and Time

July 28th, 2010 | 6:30-9:30PM

Webtrends

851 SW 6th Ave.
Portland OR 97204
(map)

RSVP on Yahoo! Upcoming, or view the event on Calagator

Note to newcomers: If you haven’t been to Webtrends before, you might have a difficult time gaining access to the building. Please E-mail me for detailed instructions on how to enter the building, and a phone number you can reach to gain access once inside.

Google Group:

Ed Borasky started a Google group called pdx-visualization. As the name implies, it is a group for Portland-area people interested in languages and techniques for visualization of data. http://groups.google.com/group/pdx-visualization.

Innovation in Data Visualization Group on Flickr:

I’ve been collecting interesting data viz photos for a while now and posting them to Flickr. They’re all accessible on my Flickr account in this set. Most pictures contain descriptions and links to the viz sources. If you have any Flickr photos of data viz work you’ve done, or work your find innovative, be sure to add them to the group!

Also check out Aaron Parecki’s GPS Logs and Data Visualizations on Flickr.

Hope to see you all there!

——

About

Amber Case, (@caseorganic) is a Cyborg Anthropologist studying the interaction between humans and computers and how our relationship with information is changing the way we think, act, and understand the world around us. She’s obsessed with compressing the space and time it takes to get data from one place to another, especially when the final destination is the mind.

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Track Your Happiness Survey Results, The Quantified Self, and Emotional Feedback Loops

TrackYourHappiness.org is a research project that investigates what makes life worth living. It was created as part of Matt Killingsworth’s doctoral research at Harvard University. I found the project while browsing the Internet one night and decided to sign up. Here are my results:

Track Your Happiness Results for Amber Case

How does it work?

Once you sign up for TrackYourHappiness, you get asked some preliminary questions for statistical purposes. This takes about 10 minutes. Then you get sent 50 survey requests over the next month or so. Completing them gives you a picture of your happiness levels over time, as well as a number of other pieces of data that relate to happiness. The questions often asked me about how much sleep I had received the night before, or if I was talking with anyone.

I was able decide when and how often I wanted to be notified. I opted for survey prompts to be sent to me at random intervals, three times a day, to report how I was feeling and what I was doing.Because I knew I would never complete the survey if I was sent survey prompts by E-mail, I opted for SMS, eventually switching to Direct Messages from Twitter. The direct messages ended up working out the best. I received direct messages from @trackhappiness on Twitter 3 times a day, and filled them out over a period of 3 months, starting in April and ending today, July 1st.

Even with Twitter notifications, I should’ve finished sooner. 50 samples should only take half a month or so, assuming 3 are sent completed per day. However, the surveys were quite long and rather repetitive, each of them often taking 3-5 minutes to complete. I became rather fatigued of the project at the end of May, which resulted in my skipping 126 survey prompts. I let the prompts run their course on my phone through the entire month of June before I decided to break down and fill out the rest of them. That was two weeks ago. I’m finally done.

Productivity and Happiness

Track Your Happiness - Productivity vs. Happiness

My initial hypothesis was that I would be the happiest while being the most productive.

The results seem to imply, and I also noticed this while filling out survey results, that I am often tired while being very productive. Thus, high levels of productivity don’t always make me completely happy.

Additionally, productivity is tiring, so my happiness is dependent upon how I feel physically. Sometimes I’m happiest while doing everything I can *not* to be productive.

Happiness: Outside vs. Inside

Track Your Happiness - Outside vs. Inside

I found that I’m pretty much the same outside as I am while inside. (Caveat 1: I reported being outside while I was in a vehicle. Caveat 2: This survey was taken in the spring/summer, where being outside is generally awesome).

Happiness vs. Want To, Have To; Don’t Have To; Don’t Want To

Track Your Happiness - Tasks: Want To vs. Don't Want To

These results seemed a bit obvious, thought I expected that I’d be happier when doing things I wanted to do, but didn’t have to do. Instead, I reported being slightly happier doing things I wanted to do and had to do, vs. wanted to do, but didn’t have to do. And of course, I wasn’t as happy to do things I both didn’t want to do as well as didn’t have to do.

One item is missing here – the Don’t Want To, Have To. I guess I never responded with anything I didn’t want to do, but Had to Do.

Focus and Happiness

Track Your Happiness - Focus and Happiness

I’m very unhappy when I’m having a fragmented thought process, and the happiest when I’m fully focused on something. This could also be related to productivity.

Happiness: Amount of Sleep and Sleep Quality

Track Your Happiness - Amount of Sleep, Quality of Sleep

One night I got 18 hours of sleep. I forgot what night that was, but it must have been after waking up at 4 for a early morning flight to San Francisco, and getting back late at night. Who knows? Regardless, I was not very happy after I woke up. Oversleeping is not something I enjoy very much.

Other than that, as long as I get 7-10 hours of sleep, I’m pretty much fine. For some odd reason, I never took the survey after 5 or 4 hours of sleep. Those amounts always make me unhappy. My brain won’t cogitate correctly the next day because it hasn’t had enough REM time to defragment itself to make room for new ideas. Oh well.

Happiness: Being Alone vs. Being With Others

Track Your Happiness - Being Alone, Interacting with Others

I consistently talked to a similar variety of people over time, and my happiness was about the same. The only reason I might not have been as happy when talking with friends might have been due to the context of the conversation.

Often, friends let on more personal information than acquaintances might. An acquaintance, for instance, might be more concerned with keeping a situation upbeat and not diving into complex or potentially unsettling issues, stories, or problems. I don’t think I really encountered any of that, no do I on a normative basis. However, if my level happiness around friends were significantly lower than with the other types of people, I would suspect that this might be the case.

Happiness vs. Activity

Track Your Happiness - Happiness vs. Activity

Most of these responses were given during the time when I was moving into a new place. My favorite activity is, and may always be, writing on a white board. I was the least happy when I was “relaxing”. I typically don’t relax. Rather, my body forces myself to take a break. To me, relaxing is sleep. I try to get a lot of it. When I’m awake, I try to get things done.

Conclusions

Now that the survey is over, it’s nice to have this data. If I were to do this again (and I might in 6 months), I would probably not use this interface. I’d rather build my own, and then run correlative tests in the background to net useful outcomes, not outcomes that were almost completely obvious upon answering the daily questions.

An amusing side-effect of being finished is that I keep getting phantom notifications. I think that I’m getting a direct message from @trackyourhappiness with a request for data. I won’t be getting them anymore.

Pros

This survey did one very good thing: it caused me to consider my happiness quite a bit. I was very aware every day of all of my thoughts and actions. I wanted to predict what the results would be, even though it was quite obvious what the were going to be. I found that it was pretty simple to control my happiness. Also, I realized that I’m a generally happy person because I have artificially constructed an automatic feedback loop that reinforces positive environmental conditions.

For instance, sleep quality showed some pretty good results. Of course I was unhappy with a sleep quality of 0 or 30. These results are quite obvious. 100% sleep quality pretty much always meant a pretty high level of happiness.

Which means I’m a pretty simple creature. I’m happy when I’ve had enough sleep and food to eat at regular intervals. Though food was not part of the survey, I’ve been tracking food intake, time, amount and type for the last year. It really matters.

Does this mean that one can architect a feedback loop of good sleep and healthy, regular food intake in order to ensure perfect happiness? Is there a programmatic approach to perfect happiness?

As an avid social experimenter within the game The SIMS, I’ve had a chance to test all of the variables and scenarios that one can have, or be denied, and the effects on one’s happiness due to those things. In the game, one can achieve a 100% happiness level based on a number of factors which include, hunger level, cleanliness, restroom need, social interaction need, surrounding environment (if a SIM is in a messy or badly formed house, they are more likely to be unhappy) and level of rest.

In a way, I would’ve liked this survey to have more of those items. That way, it might have been able to educate people about their dependence on these external effects.

For instance, I moved into a very specific type of living situation because I had programmed it out in the SIMS and saw that it had all of the requisite items for self actualization. It’s more than just sleep quality. One must have an environment that makes quality sleep possible, and a work situation that is not so stressful that it prevents sleep. Elements of the house, commute, food, ect., are all important.

Finally, I thought the project very successful in integrating with Twitter/SMS, because I would never do it if I received an E-mail notification three times a day. SMS/Twitter integration allowed it to meld more smoothly into the processes of my everyday life.


Cons

It left out a lot of things, like the last time I ate, what I ate, how tired I felt, how stressed, ect. These have a lot of bearing on happiness. Sometimes it asked me if I was thinking negative thoughts. If I said yes, it asked me if I could control these thoughts if I wanted to. This was as close as the survey got to getting at some sort of psychological effect determining happiness. The only other things it tracked were location, socialization and sleep. For me, it’s obvious that getting a bad night of sleep affects my happiness.

I’d like to know if my eating habits or times affect my happiness. There’s a lot more that can be gathered here that the survey failed to capture and record.

About

Amber Case, (@caseorganic) is a Cyborg Anthropologist studying the interaction between humans and computers and how our relationship with information is changing the way we think, act, and understand the world around us. She’s obsessed with compressing the space and time it takes to get data from one place to another, especially when the final destination is the mind.

Data Viz: Donations to the Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

Portland Donation Amount by Location - Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

On March 17, 2010, I slipped on a slippery deck in Austin, Texas. It was the last day of the SXSW Interactive Conference, and it had been a long night.

I wanted to get outside to take a break from all of the madness, and I fell. I broke all of the bones in my ankle and was rushed to the emergency room. I didn’t feel any pain, and I thought that my ankle was simply sprained. It was not. The emergency room staff gave me a pair of crutches and told me how to walk on them. It was very difficult at first, but now I’ve gotten pretty good at them.

I woke up the next morning still in shock, so nothing hurt yet. My flight from Austin to Portland was later that afternoon, and I was determined to go home, even with a broken ankle. I took a few Tylenol and got to the airport with the help of Paige Saez and many others at the Social Media Clubhouse. When I got back to Portland I asked Twitter for an orthopedic surgeon. @pdxflaneur gave me the name of one and I scheduled surgery the next evening. I was checked into day surgery at 3 Pm and waited for surgery until 1Am. The waiting was the most difficult part.

Then, I became a Cyborg. Here’s an X-ray of what the orthopedic surgeon put into my ankle. The surgery was originally supposed to take 45 minutes, but when they opened up the sides of my ankle, they realized that all the bones had splintered into tiny pieces. The surgery ended up taking 4 hours. A lot of hardware was required to stabilize the bones while they healed back into place.

Amber Case's Cyborg ankle post-surgery

Right away, Vancouver-based photographer Kris Krug started the Cyborg Reconstruction Fund in an attempt to help defray medical costs. Once the word got out, the donations started rolling in. Aaron Parecki and I thought it might be fun to visualize the data.

cyborg-re-construction-fund-amber-case

The following images are visualizations of donations to the fund from March 20, 2010 to April 10, 2010. The data was taken from a PayPal Excel file and put into a SQL database based on location and amount of donation. The Google Maps API was used to place and visualize the donation data.

Bar Graph - Average Donations Per State Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

Here, we graphed the total amount of money donated by ‘state’. Oregon was in first place, with $1,200, followed by California, New York and Washington State. Note that this graph has some non-states as well, like British Columbia, London, Ontario, Quebec and Alcorcon (which is in Spain). Perhaps it could be called donations by territory instead.

Total National Donations Per State - Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

Here are the total donations per state. Oregon had the largest number of donations, but the average donation amount amount was less than the other states.

National Average Donation Amount Per Person - Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

This map shows the average donations per person by state. Washington and New York had the largest donation amount per person, but less donations overall. California followed, due to some awesome people in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

National Donation Amount Per Location - Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

This map shows donations by location and amount.The size of the circle shows the total volume of money donated. The circles are set at 50% opacity, so many donations overlapping (in the case of Portland) create a more opaque circle.

Portland Donation Amount by Location - Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

This map shows donations from Portland, Oregon. Portland had the highest number of donations, which makes a lot of sense. Portland is my local tech community! Everyone was kind and concerned about the injury. But there’s an issue on this map: circles float above people’s houses. This undermines personal data privacy. To fix this, the address data of donors was made ‘fuzzy’ in order to protect the confidential addresses of Paypal donors. The fuzziness was made by taking the latitude and longitude coordinates of each address and adding a random number to each.

Again, to everyone who has chipped in: thank you so much for all of your messages, your kindness and your support. The surgery actually cost more than twice the amount of the estimate that shown on the donation site. I applied for financial support from the hospital system, so things should turn out okay in the end. If it wasn’t for all of you, I wouldn’t have been able to pay the necessary bills required at the hospital. All of you made that possible. You helped purchase a walking boot, X-rays, appointments and checkups, local anesthesia, food, and pain medication. You got me through.

And you’ve all made me feel connected to this community in a much different way than ever experienced before. I’m honored to know so many incredible people. Thanks again for your amazing connectivity and efforts.

A Great Big Thank You

It turns out that it does “Take a Village to Build Cyborg”. Thanks again to the wonderful Vancouverites Kris Krug, Danielle Sipple, Dave Olson, Jason Saunders, and Robert Scales. Thanks to Chris Heuer and Kristie Wells for providing support and help with getting some funding and insurance. Thanks to Ponzi Pirillo for the delicious sandwiches and multiple rides to the hospital. I couldn’t have fallen in a better place. I couldn’t imagine falling alone.

Thanks to Paige Saez for helping me at the airport, through security, for carrying my stuff and keeping me company on the long plane ride from Austin to Portland. Thanks to Sheldon Renan for bringing me comics and soup and providing continuous council. Thanks to Brian K. for bringing ferns with microchips in them to my hospital room. Thanks to Ian Carmany for dealing with impossible hospital room waits and a whole lot of other things.

A very special thanks to Abraham Hyatt, Igal Koshevoy, Chris Pirillo, Audrey Eschright, Linda Canavan, Anne Buckley, Valdis Krebs, Orian Marx, Kate Bornstein, Susan Farrell and Spary Dauterman.

Enormous thanks to Periscopic, SalaamGarage, and Bo McFarland.

While I can’t mention everyone, I made an effort to personally thank everyone by E-mail. If you didn’t get an E-mail from me, please let me know! I want to make sure that I thanked you! It’s very important.

Still want to donate?

This donate link will take you directly to PayPal.
——

About

Amber Case, (@caseorganic) is a Cyborg Anthropologist studying the interaction between humans and computers and how our relationship with information is changing the way we think, act, and understand the world around us. She’s obsessed with compressing the space and time it takes to get data from one place to another, especially when the final destination is the mind.

Visualizing eComm and the Augmented Reality Conference 2010 with Stacked Graphs

Note: This is a content preview of a full resolution PDF report that will be made available on the site next week.

A stacked graph method is one way of displaying buzz around speakers and topics at conferences. I’ve been tracking conferences with stream/stacked graphs for the last two years.

In a way, the stacked graph is a more organic version of a bar graph, because it can be used to show an increase and decrease in volumes of conversation around a subject.

eComm Emerging Communications Conference - Augmented Reality Conference

What is This?

This is a stacked graph displaying Tweets associated with the #eComm and #arconf hashtags during the three days of San Francisco’s Emerging Communications Conference and the Augmented Reality Conference from 4/19/10-4/21/10.

The interesting part about visualizing data in this way is that it shows that there is an inherent difference between what a speaker says and what an audience “hears”. Hearing, in this case, is defined by how a speaker’s name, company, and words are picked up by microbloggers and re-tweeted online.

After looking at the full graph of the conference over three days, @anthropunk commented that while the streamgraph for #arconf was significantly larger than those for the other days, it did not necessarily mean that the first two days of the conference were not interesting, but that there were simply more people tweeting during the last day of the conference.

History

Until recently, I used a Java applet that only queried the last 1000 tweets associated with a word. A month ago, stacked graph creator Lee Byron, released his source code, allowing Nathan Bergey to build an open source version of the Neoformix Twitter Stream Graph. Aaron Parecki was whitelisted on the Twitter API, and their combined capabilities allowed for a greater level of data visualization to occur.

Now we all have an excellent way to visualize Tweets associated with conference hashtags. This method of data visualization is an improvement on a the process I used to visualize the Internet Strategy Forum Summit 2009 and the Internet Strategy Forum 2008.

This project was originally inspired by the Neoformix Twitter Stream graph. It was a clunky, limited machine programmed in Java. After several requests for the source code, we were forced to make our own. The result is a much better, lighter, and faster loading system that has a linear time scale. Nathan Bergey was the force behind this. He created a Python Stream Graph Library that Aaron Parecki was able to use to make the graphs.

Stream Graphs and Wordle Clouds

A stacked graph shows the same data as a Wordle graph, but adds an axis of time.

The conference visualization is split up into sections according to time. Each day and time period has two graphs associated with it. One is the stacked graph, and the other is a Wordle graph. The stacked graph shows time and volume, while the Worlde simply shows volume.

Monday, April 19th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/2010

Morning

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Morning 4/19/10

8:45:00 AM

Introduction

Hello and Welcome (Replacement)

Doc Searls, Harvard University/UC Santa Barbara

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM
Keynote
The Future of P2P
Eric Klinker, Bit Torrent

9:00:00 – 9:22:30 AM, Salon E

9:22:30 AM
Keynote
Communications Heading Into The Cloud
Craig Walker, Google

9:22:30 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Keynote

The National Broadband Plan and the Future of the Internet

Carlos Kirjner, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

9:45:00 – 10:07:30 AM, Salon E

10:07:30 AM

Keynote

The Rise of the Open Network: Or How I was David Isenberged into Submission

JP Rangaswami, British Telecom/Ribbit

10:07:30 – 10:30:00 AM, Salon E

10:30:00 AM

Break

Morning Break

11:15:00 AM

Keynote

Social Sharing 2.0: The Rise of Real-Time

Jonathan Rosenberg, Skype

11:15:00 – 11:35:00 AM, Salon E

11:35:00 AM

Keynote

Identity for Global Communication

Cullen Jennings, Cisco

11:35:00 – 11:55:00 AM, Salon E

11:55:00 AM

An Anthropologist’s Eye for the Tech Guy: Emerging Market Opportunities in a Post-BRIC World

Dawn Nafus, Intel

11:55:00 – 12:10:00 PM, Salon E

12:10:00 PM

Launch

Ringio Launch

Michael Zirngibl, Ringio

12:10:00 – 12:17:30 PM, Salon E

12:17:30 PM

Launch

CounterPath Launch

Donovan Jones, CounterPath

12:17:30 – 12:25:00 PM, Salon E

12:25:00 PM

Launch

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Telio Launch

Alan Duric, Telio

12:25:00 – 12:32:30 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/19/2010

2:00:00 PM


The Future of Mobile Networks: Offloading Congested Mobile Networks with a Software-Only Approach

Elad Barkan, Bzeek

2:00:00 – 2:10:00 PM, Salon E

2:10:00 PM

How Open Data and the Gov 2.0 Movement are Changing Communications With Government

Mark Headd, Tele-Works, Inc.

2:10:00 – 2:20:00 PM, Salon E

2:20:00 PM

Keynote

What Can Cities be Like When Everything Talks

Assaf Biderman, MIT

2:20:00 – 2:40:00 PM, Salon E

2:40:00 PM

Lightning Talk

With 500 Ways to Communicate, Why Should a Customer Choose Your New Offering?

Jared Goralnick, AwayFind

2:40:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

Orbiting Data Centers for Global Connectivity

Keith Lofstrom, Server Sky

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

Your Reality is Augmented

Benjamin Joffe, +8*

3:00:00 – 3:15:00 PM, Salon E

3:15:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Evening

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/19/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/19/2010

4:00:00 PM

Keynote

Making Music with the World on the iPad and iPhone

Ge Wang, Smule/Stanford

4:00:00 – 4:30:00 PM, Salon E

4:30:00 PM

Mobile Video Communication – iPhone & Android Lead the Way

Jan Linden, Global IP Solutions

4:30:00 – 4:45:00 PM, Salon E

4:45:00 PM

Recombinant Communications Manifesto: Piecing Together the Disaggregated Infrastructure

Dan Miller, Opus Research

4:45:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

Disruption and Death: Telephony, Open Platform and Network APIs

Oren Michels, Mashery

5:00:00 – 5:15:00 PM, Salon E

5:15:00 PM

Evolution of Mobile Applications: Role of WebKit and High-End Browsers

Benoit Schillings, Myriad Group AG

5:15:00 – 5:30:00 PM, Salon E

5:30:00 PM

Designing For The Future

Julia Tsao, yU+co/Fair Enough
5:30:00 – 5:40:00 PM, Salon E
5:40:00 PM

STATUS: Bringing User Presence To The Voice World

Zhao Lu, Orange Labs

5:40:00 – 5:50:00 PM, Salon E

5:50:00 PM

Keynote

(Moved to Tuesday 10:00-10:15, Due To Volcanic Ash) Cloud Communications and How to Destroy a $700bn Industry for Fun and Profit

Martin Geddes, Independent

5:50:00 – 6:05:00 PM, Salon E

5:50:00 PM

Beyond Voice – Designing an Open Communications Platform (Moved Into Slot, Due To Volcanic Ash)

Jose de Castro, Voxeo

5:50:00 – 6:05:00 PM, Salon E

6:05:00 PM

Keynote

Macro Trends and Predictions in Mobile Broadband (Calling In Due To Volcanic Ash)

Moray Rumney, Agilent

6:05:00 – 6:25:00 PM, Salon E

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/20/2010

eComm Wordle Graph Entire Day 4/20/2010

Morning

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/20/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Morning 4/20/2010

8:45:00 AM

Introduction

Introductions (Replacement)

Benoit Schillings, Myriad Group AG

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM

Keynote

Infrastructure Shift: The Long-Term Challenge of Change

John Hagel, LLP Center for the Edge

9:00:00 – 9:30:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Beyond Squeezing Lemons: The Future of Collaborative Business Models

Anders Sundelin, CIP

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

Managing Growth and Profits in the Yottabyte Era (Replacement)

Chetan Sharma, Chetan Sharma Consulting

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Customer Experience in the Call Center: Can the Leaks in the Pipeline be Fixed?

Shai Berger, F?nolo

9:45:00 – 10:00:00 AM, Salon E

10:00:00 AM

(Moved to Monday 17:50-18:05, Due To Volcanic Ash) Beyond Voice – Designing an Open Communications Platform

Jose de Castro, Voxeo

10:00:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:00:00 AM

Cloud Communications and How to Destroy a $700bn Industry for Fun and Profit (Moved Into Slot, Due To Volcanic Ash)

Martin Geddes, Independent

10:00:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:15:00 AM

Break

Morning Break

11:00:00 AM

Yesterday’s Wire for Tomorrow’s Apps?

Brian Harris, New Mexico Attorney General

11:00:00 – 11:15:00 AM, Salon E

11:15:00 AM

Internet Gone Mobile

Richard Bennett, ITIF

11:15:00 – 11:30:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Ubiquitous Collaboration: The Next Wave of Productivity?

Joe Burton, Cisco

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

Teleku :: Cloud Communications (Replacement)

Chris Matthieu, GetVocal

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

Keynote

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Our National Broadband Plan: The End of the Beginning?

Richard Whitt, Google

11:45:00 – 12:05:00 PM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

Yeah I’m Stuck Too (Replacement)

Patrick Murphy, VoiceSage

11:45:00 – 12:00:00 PM, Salon E

12:00:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Moderator Introduction

Brough Turner, Ashtonbrooke

12:00:00 – 12:07:00 PM, Salon E

12:07:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Paul Brigner Introduction

Paul Brigner, Verizon

12:07:00 – 12:09:00 PM, Salon E

12:09:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Susan Estrada Introduction

Susan Estrada, FirstMile.US

12:09:00 – 12:11:00 PM, Salon E

12:11:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Tracy Rosenberg Introduction

Tracy Rosenberg, Media Alliance

12:11:00 – 12:13:00 PM, Salon E

12:13:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan – Richard Bennett Introduction

Richard Bennett, ITIF

12:13:00 – 12:15:00 PM, Salon E

12:15:00 PM

Panel

US National Broadband Plan

Brough Turner, Ashtonbrooke

12:15:00 – 12:35:00 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stacked Graph Afternoon 4/20/2010

eComm Wordle Graph Afternoon 4/20/2010

2:00:00 PM

Panel

Walk-On Panel

You!

2:00:00 – 2:30:00 PM, Salon E

2:30:00 PM

Participatory Sensing

Deborah Estrin, UCLA Computer Science Department

2:30:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

Mapping Mobile Social Networks with NodeXL: Finding Key Users, Groups, and Locations

Marc A Smith, ConnectedAction

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

The 6th Sense Accelerator: When Mobile Meets Intuition

Barak Hachamov, My6sense

3:00:00 – 3:15:00 PM, Salon E

3:15:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Evening

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/20/2010

eComm Stacked Graph Evening 4/20/2010

4:00:00 PM

Bring Your Own Wireless: How Smart Mobile Phones are Revolutionizing Wireline Customers

Piers Finlayson, Metaswitch

4:00:00 – 4:15:00 PM, Salon E

4:15:00 PM

Everything You Think You Know About High Performance Military Communications is Wrong

Tom Katis, RebelVox

4:15:00 – 4:30:00 PM, Salon E

4:30:00 PM

Keynote

Smart People, Dumb Objects, Networked Environments

Usman Haque, Pachube/Connected Environments

4:30:00 – 4:50:00 PM, Salon E

4:50:00 PM

From Distraction to Real Life, Humanizing our Mobile Future

Kristian Simsarian, IDEO

4:50:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

A Glimpse Into the Future if XMPP and Wave are Successful

Jason Kolb, Cisco

5:00:00 – 5:15:00 PM, Salon E

5:15:00 PM

A Telephone System for the Next Three Billion

David A. Burgess, Kestrel Signal Processing

5:15:00 – 5:30:00 PM, Salon E

5:30:00 PM

Demo

Towards Painless, Free, Open Phone Data

Troy Davis, Cloudvox

5:30:00 – 5:40:00 PM, Salon E

5:40:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Introduction

Mike Rowehl, Mobile Monday Silicon Valley

5:40:00 – 5:42:00 PM, Salon E

5:42:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – CrowdScanner

Adrian Avendano, Meetforeal & CrowdScanner

5:42:00 – 5:45:00 PM, Salon E

5:45:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Aloqa

Sanjeev Agrawal, Aloqa

5:45:00 – 5:48:00 PM, Salon E

5:48:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – My6sense

Barak Hachamov, My6sense

5:48:00 – 5:51:00 PM, Salon E

5:51:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Waze

Di-Ann Eisnor, Waze

5:51:00 – 5:54:00 PM, Salon E

5:54:00 PM

Awards

Mobile Application Awards – Trippo VoiceMagix

Kimmo Sainio, Cellictica

5:54:00 – 5:57:00 PM, Salon E

5:57:00 PM

The Information in Everything: The Augmented Future of Communications

Adam Broitman, Circ.us

5:57:00 – 6:12:00 PM, Salon E

6:12:00 PM

Lightning Talk

Walk and Talk: Augmenting Conversation

Phil Wolff, Reef9 Media

6:12:00 – 6:17:00 PM, Salon E

6:20:00 PM

Event

Free Drinks Social Networking


Wednesday, April 21th, 2010

eComm Stacked Graph Entire Day 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Entire Day 4/19/10

Morning

eComm Stream Graph Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Morning 4/19/10

8:30:00 AM

Introduction

Introductions (Replacement)

Christine Perey, Perey Research & Consulting

8:30:00 – 8:45:00 AM, Salon E

8:45:00 AM

Sci-Fi to Sci-Fact: How Computer Vision Will Change AR and the World

Ben Newhouse, Yelp

8:45:00 – 9:00:00 AM, Salon E

9:00:00 AM

Keynote

Searches Originating Inside and Outside of your Head

Hartmut Neven, Google

9:00:00 – 9:30:00 AM, Salon E

9:30:00 AM

Generating Revenues with Mobile AR: The Ecosystem, Business Models and Metrics

Christine Perey, Perey Research & Consulting

9:30:00 – 9:45:00 AM, Salon E

9:45:00 AM

Keynote

Bridging the Gap Between Desktop and Mobile Augmented Reality

Blake Callens, Zugara

9:45:00 – 10:05:00 AM, Salon E

10:05:00 AM

What’s Wrong With ‘Reality’?

Usman Haque, Pachube/Connected Environments

10:05:00 – 10:15:00 AM, Salon E

10:15:00 AM

Break

Morning Break


Late Morning

eComm Wordle Graph Late Morning 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Late Morning 4/19/10

11:00:00 AM

A View to a Future; Beyond the Hype of Mobile Augmented Reality Applications

Dana Farbo, Acrossair

11:00:00 – 11:15:00 AM, Salon E

11:15:00 AM

User Experience: A Possible Roadblock to AR Adoption

Tony Fernandes, The UE Group

11:15:00 – 11:30:00 AM, Salon E

11:30:00 AM

Context Is King: AR, Salience, and the Constant Next Scenario

Clark Dodsworth, Osage Associates Consulting

11:30:00 – 11:45:00 AM, Salon E

11:45:00 AM

The Wizard is Us: Symbiogenesis by Networking Part 1

Arturo Sinclair, Digital Worlds Institute

11:45:00 – 11:52:50 AM, Salon E

11:52:50 AM

The Wizard is Us: Symbiogenesis by Networking Part 2

Anton Yudin, Digital Worlds Institute

11:52:50 – 12:00:00 PM, Salon E

12:00:00 PM

Applying WWW Best Practices to AR

Erik Bovee, Mobilizy

12:00:00 – 12:15:00 PM, Salon E

12:15:00 PM

Where AR We Heading?

Steven Feiner, Columbia University

12:15:00 – 12:30:00 PM, Salon E

12:30:00 PM

Break

Social Networking Lunch


Afternoon

eComm Stream Graph Afternoon 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Afternoon 4/19/10

2:00:00 PM

Advancing the Business of AR, A Practical, Commercial Solution

Pamela Kerwin, GeoVector

2:00:00 – 2:15:00 PM, Salon E

2:15:00 PM

Who Will Own Our Augmented Reality?

Anselm Hook, Meedan

2:15:00 – 2:25:00 PM, Salon E

2:25:00 PM

Mobile Augmented Reality: The World Is Your Playground

Brian Selzer, Ogmento

2:25:00 – 2:35:00 PM, Salon E

2:35:00 PM

Spatial Computing: Designing an Interface for our Bodies

Albert Hwang, phedhex.com

2:35:00 – 2:45:00 PM, Salon E

2:45:00 PM

AR Today and Tomorrow

Bruno Uzzan, Total Immersion

2:45:00 – 3:00:00 PM, Salon E

3:00:00 PM

Advancing AR – Beyond Labels

Ivan Franco, YDreams

3:00:00 – 3:10:00 PM, Salon E

3:10:00 PM

Junaio and the Unifeye SDK Mobile Development Platform

Peter Meier, metaio GmbH

3:10:00 – 3:25:00 PM, Salon E

3:25:00 PM

Break

Afternoon Break


Early Evening

eComm Wordle Graph Early Evening 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Early Evening 4/19/10

4:00:00 PM

Keynote

Future Vision: Decade of Ubiquity (Augmented Reality 2010-2020)

Robert Rice, Neogence Enterprises

4:00:00 – 4:20:00 PM, Salon E

4:20:00 PM

(Canceled Due To Volcanic Ash) Visual Recognition, the Future of Mobile AR browsers

David Marimon, Telefonica R&D

4:20:00 – 4:35:00 PM, Salon E

4:20:00 PM

Augmented Reality & The Venture Capital Community

David Blumberg, Blumberg Capital

4:20:00 – 4:35:00 PM, Salon E

4:35:00 PM

Seeing the Future of AR Through Digital Eyewear

Yohan Baillot, (Independent)

4:35:00 – 4:45:00 PM, Salon E

4:45:00 PM

Eyeborg – Terminator Lives

Rob Spence, Eyeborg Project

4:45:00 – 5:00:00 PM, Salon E

5:00:00 PM

Keynote

Strange Days. How the Computing Experience is Turning Inside Out

Mark Rolston, frog design

5:00:00 – 5:20:00 PM, Salon E

5:20:00 PM

Break

Late Afternoon Break


Late Evening

eComm Stream Graph Evening 4/19/10

eComm Wordle Graph Evening 4/19/10

5:45:00 PM

Story as Software

John du Pre Gauntt, Media Dojo

5:45:00 – 6:00:00 PM, Salon E

6:00:00 PM

Solid to Liquid to Air: Cyborg Anthropology and the Future of the Interface

Amber Case, CyborgCamp

6:00:00 – 6:15:00 PM, Salon E

6:15:00 PM

Navigation Rising! A Deep Look at Live Mapping and Augmented Reality in the Car

Di-Ann Eisnor, Waze

6:15:00 – 6:30:00 PM, Salon E

6:30:00 PM

Building Business Models Around Augmented Reality

Matthew Szymczyk, Zugara

6:30:00 – 6:45:00 PM, Salon E

6:45:00 PM

Building Mobile Augmented Reality Applications with 3DAR

Mark Anderson, Bordertown Labs

6:45:00 – 7:00:00 PM, Salon E

7:00:00 PM

AR and the Mass-Market Business Opportunity

Matt Miesnieks, Layar

7:00:00 – 7:10:00 PM, Salon E

7:10:00 PM

Liberating AR from Basemaps, Markers and Overlays

Eric Kabisch, University of California, Department of Informatics

7:10:00 – 7:22:30 PM, Salon E

7:22:30 PM

Vision Based Mobile AR – A New User Interface For Mobile Applications?

Michael Gervautz, Qualcomm

7:22:30 – 7:35:00 PM, Salon E

7:35:00 PM

The Future of Augmented Reality

Steve Hoffman, ThinkHuge

7:35:00 – 7:50:00 PM, Salon E

7:50:00 PM

Event

Free Drinks Social Networking


Conclusions

Credits:

This image was created by Nathan Bergey (@natronics) and Aaron Parecki (@aaronpk). Aaron took data from the Twitter API and passed it through Nathan’s Python Twitter stacked graph library. This image excludes the actual “#ecomm” and &quote;#arconf” terms leaving more room for the other terms to show through.

About

Stacked Graph History
Here’s a link to Lee Byron’s original Stacked Graph paper, “Stacked Graphs – Geometry & Aesthetics” www.leebyron.com/else/streamgraph/

“streamgraph_generator” can be checked out from github.

You can make these as well by downloading @natronic’s Python Stream Graph Library on GitHub.

Get the StreamGraph Python Code on Github

—–

About

Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist living and working in Portland, Oregon. You can follow her on Twitter at @caseorganic.

The Third Portland Data Visualization Group | Thurs, April 29, 2010: 6:30–9Pm at Webtrends

It’s time for another Portland Data Visualization Meetup. The last one occurred on November 3rd, 2009. We’ll have five main presentations and networking time. Webtrends will again graciously host us on their top floor. Unfortunately, there will not be beer. If you want to, you can bring your own. Or if you know a company who could bring some, let me know.

Schedule

1. StreamGraphs for Visualizing Twitter searches

Amber Case @caseorganic
Background of streamgraphs for visualizing Twitter searches

  • Use case
  • Limitations

Aaron Parecki @aaronpk

Data collection from Twitter

  • Twitter whitelisting
  • Storing in MSQL
  • Preparing data (removing words) for Python library

Nathan Bergey @natronics

  • Implementing the streamgraph algorithm in Python
  • Open Source, Python
  • How it works
  • SVG library

Conclusions, analysis and highlights
Amber, Nathan Aaron

>>Break<<

2. Ben Stabler

  • Flex/Flash data visualization platform
  • R visualization

3. Nathan Bergey

  • Gource (video)
    • Program for visualizing commit history in a git-based code project.

4. Aaron Parecki

  • Subversion Commit Logs
    • Showing work habits through visualizing the two years of source code logs.
  • GPS Map of Portland
    • Showing where Aaron has been in Portland from October 2009-April 2010.

5. Data Viz of Cyborg Reconstruction Fund

Data Visualization for PayPal donations to @caseorganic’s ankle surgery fundraiser.

  • PayPal Data
  • MySQL table
  • Google Maps/Chart code
  • Final Images


Who Should Go?

The event is open to everyone interested in or working in the field of data visualization. This means designers, programmers, information architects, data miners, anthropologists, ect. We’re expecting a similar amount of people to last time (probably around 20-30 people).

Location and Time

Webtrends

851 SW 6th Ave.
Portland OR 97204
(map)

RSVP on Upcoming or view the event on Calagator.

Note to newcomers: If you haven’t been to Webtrends before, you might have a difficult time gaining access to the building. Please E-mail me for detailed instructions on how to enter the building, and a phone number you can reach to gain access once inside.

Google Group:

Ed Borasky started a Google group called pdx-visualization. As the name implies, it is a group for Portland-area people interested in languages and techniques for visualization of data. http://groups.google.com/group/pdx-visualization.

Innovation in Data Visualization Group on Flickr:

I’ve been collecting interesting data viz photos for a while now and posting them to Flickr. They’re all accessible on my Flickr account in this set. Most pictures contain descriptions and links to the viz sources. If you have any Flickr photos of data viz work you’ve done, or work your find innovative, be sure to add them to the group!

Also check out Aaron Parecki’s GPS Logs and Data Visualizations on Flickr.

Hope to see you all there!

——

About

Amber Case, (@caseorganic) is a Cyborg Anthropologist studying the interaction between humans and computers and how our relationship with information is changing the way we think, act, and understand the world around us. She’s obsessed with compressing the space and time it takes to get data from one place to another, especially when the final destination is the mind.

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